Miami Beach

VACO Studios

The City of Miami Beach is attempting to change people's perspectives of Memorial Day weekend by hosting its very first arts and cultural festival, called ReFrame.

Local artists will showcase works of art that spark crucial conversations about inclusion, blackness and relationships.

Octavia Yearwood, one of the festival's curators, says the media has historically portrayed visitors, particularly people of color, in a way that makes residents feel they should flee for the weekend. She hopes ReFrame can reshape the weekend's past "energy and vibe."

Sam Turken / WLRN News

More than 150 beachgoers, activists and elected officials joined hands at noon Saturday on the shore of Miami Beach to call for more environmental stewardship and to protest against offshore oil drilling and fossil fuels.

“What we’ve got are a bunch of people who care about the world, and we’re standing together along the water to say, ‘This is our beach, this our world.' To say, 'Yes to clean renewable energy,'” said Sam Van Leer, president of the non-profit Urban Paradise Guild.

Maria Alejandra Cardona / The Miami Herald

Miami Beach City Commission is cracking down on events regulations during what they refer to as "high impact events", such as Spring Break and Memorial Day weekend, alleging these times stretch city resources to regulate traffic, parking and policing.

The proposed ordinance, with regulations aimend primarily toward businesses and promoters, passed the first vote on Wednesday. It'll go through revisions before a final vote that's scheduled for April 24th.

Arianna Prothero / WLRN

An international program that has helped South Florida cities address climate change and other livability challenges is ending. 

Discoizzy / Wikimedia Commons

Thousands of college students are crowding South Florida beaches as they normally do this time of year for spring break.

Most spring breakers land on Miami Beach, but the city is not happy with what it's seeing. According to the Miami Herald, there have been beach brawls,  heavy drinking and injured police officers.

Andy Sweet / Courtesy

Before the city of Miami Beach became a hotspot for nightlife and celebrities, it was home to a massive Jewish retiree population. It's estimated that 20,000 elderly Jews made up more than half of the beach's population in the late 1970s. This era in Miami's history and the experiences of the Jewish community is the focus of a new book of photography entitled "Shtetl in the Sun: Andy Sweet's South Beach Photography 1977-1980."

pbarcas/flickr

Florida’s Supreme Court effectively blocked on Tuesday a Miami Beach law that would have raised the minimum wage in the city, ending a years long battle to allow Florida cities to set their own minimum wages.

The city passed an ordinance under former Mayor Philip Levine in 2016 that would have raised the minimum wage in the city to $13.31 by January 1st, 2021.

Katie Lepri / WLRN

Tucked among vape shops and tattoo parlors, a cat cafe has popped up on Washington Avenue between 14th Street and Española Way. Tourists soaking in the sun in a post-Christmas stupor peer through a window into a version of the paradise surrounding them.

  

For the 26 cat “residents,” it’s called Purradise. They roam freely in a space emulating South Beach – complete with palm tree scratch posts, lifeguard stands and bean bags resembling beach balls, which serve as ideal nap pods for tabbies, calicos and Persians.

Lily Oppenheimer / WLRN

The smell of steaming jelly doughnuts fried in oil carried through Lincoln Road on Sunday, the eighth and final night of Hanukkah festivities on Miami Beach.

Between improvised versions of ‘I Have A Little Dreidel’ and lighting the menorah, members of the Jewish community reflected on a challenging few months.

Lily Oppenheimer / WLRN

The Miami Beach Convention Center has completed its three-year, $620-million renovation in time for the start of the annual international Art Basel festival.

Miami Herald

Events like Art Basel and Spring Break bring tens of thousands of spectators, art aficionados and tourists to Miami, but creates logistical challenges for residents.

Miami Beach Police Chief Daniel Oates says the "real solution" to improve the safety and traffic nightmare is a "robust" security plan and more cops on the ground.  

Oates joined Sundial to talk about his department's efforts.

This conversation has been edited lightly for clarity. 

STIAN ROENNING / MIAMI HERALD

A new play at the Colony Theater in Miami Beach tells the story of the night Cassius Clay won the heavyweight title and became Muhammad Ali.

The show, “One Night in Miami,” takes the audience back to February 25, 1964, and recounts the history of a celebratory night in an Overtown motel room with four best friends: Muhammad Ali, Sam Cooke, Jim Brown, and Malcolm X.

WLRN

In a case being watched by business groups and local governments, the city of Miami Beach is asking the Florida Supreme Court to act quickly in a battle about the legality of a local minimum wage.

Justices last month, in a 4-3 decision, agreed to take up the city’s appeal of a ruling that blocked a minimum-wage ordinance from taking effect. The ordinance, approved in 2016, had been planned to set the minimum wage in the city at $10.31 an hour this year, with annual incremental increases to $13.31 an hour in January 2021.

Miami Herald

Beginning next year, Miami Beach’s hotel housekeepers will be armed.

Their weapon, panic buttons, will help combat sexual harassment and assault in the workplace, a problem that is being more widely discussed and addressed following the emergence of the #MeToo movement. Beginning Aug. 1, 2019, Miami Beach will be the third tourism town, after Seattle and Chicago, to mandate that hotels provide the devices. The Beach is calling them “safety buttons.”

Miami Beach Police Department

The former Marlborough House condominium building in Miami Beach collapsed Monday morning, injuring one, according to Miami Beach police.

The building no longer had residents. Permits had been pulled for the destruction of the 13-floor building built in 1963 and bought by Brazilian developer Jose Isaac Peres. Peres plans an 89-story tower on the beachfront property at 5775 Collins Ave.

Pages