postpartum depression

"Crazy," "hysterical," "overreactive," "hormonal." These are stereotypes many women still have to fight to be taken seriously. And that fight can be especially challenging because so many women do face very real symptoms such as bloating, headaches, irritability and mood changes — often on a monthly cycle.

Portia Smith's most vivid memories of her daughter's first year are of tears. Not the baby's. Her own.

"I would just hold her and cry all day," Smith recalls.

At 18, Smith was caring for two children, 4-year-old Kelaiah and newborn Nelly, with little help from her abusive relationship. The circumstances were difficult, but she knew the tears were more than that.

One in nine women in the United States suffer from depression after childbirth. For some women, postpartum depression is so bad that they struggle to care for their children and may even consider or attempt suicide.

Four months after having her second baby, Jessica Porten started feeling really irritable. Little things would annoy her, like her glider chair.

"It had started to squeak," she says. "And so when I'm sitting there rocking the baby and it's squeaking, I would just get so angry at that stupid chair."

Miami Filmmaker Documents Postpartum Depression

Jun 4, 2015
Maureen Fura

Miami filmmaker Maureen Fura's latest work takes a critical look at postpartum depression and the struggle many women with this condition face when it comes to getting support and treatment.

She recently sat down with us to talk about her film, "Dark Side of the Full Moon," which is being screened Saturday in Miami Beach as part of the 10th International Women's Film Festival.