science

ACHMAD IBRAHIM / ASSOCIATED PRESS

On this Wednesday, Jan. 29, episode of Sundial:

A local infectious-disease expert on Coronavirus

Thousands of visitors are descending upon Miami for the Super Bowl LIV this weekend and with concerns about the coronavirus, Miami International Airport has installed quarantine stations with dedicated Centers for Disease Control and Prevention staff to screen for the disease.

NOAA

Florida has an underappreciated secret weapon to help heal its ailing reefs: prickly sea urchins.

With a bit of luck, people in the Eastern United States will be able to witness a rare meteor shower known as the Alpha Monocerotids late Thursday night. Two astronomers predicted the outburst will last less than an hour and could even yield more than 400 meteors in that time.

A University of Miami doctor says he can rebuild a whole jaw using new stem cell collection technology.

Known as the “MarrowMarxman”, the FDA-registered device was developed and tested by Dr. Robert Marx, who is a professor and chief of the Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine

 

“The medical device is an improvement over current technology,” he said. 

FAU research
Caitie Switalski / WLRN

Research students from Florida Atlantic University, Broward College and Miami Dade College showcased their projects Friday morning at the 9th annual student research symposium in Davie. 

The students were judged on how clearly they were able to communicate their research to an audience that reaches beyond fellow scientists.

Many of the projects focused on health and environmental issues - like studying Bachman's sparrow. 

Toxic red tide algae is starting to bloom along Florida’s west coast again. State wildlife officials say elevated levels have been detected recently from Pinellas to Collier counties, and people in Sarasota County have also been experiencing respiratory irritations.

Now, new research is looking into longterm health effects of the toxins, including neurological issues.

SpaceX successfully launched 60 communications satellites on Monday using a single rocket.

It's the second time in less than a year that Elon Musk's company has made such a launch, marking a dramatic increase in the number of satellites in orbit.

Brent Stirton / National Geographic

National Geographic Cuban-American explorer Mireya Mayor has returned to her hometown of Miami. The former Miami Dolphins cheerleader has traveled to the most remote places of the world like Madagascar and the Congo. Mayor has swum with sharks, been chased by elephants, bitten by poisonous bugs and charged by gorillas. Her adventures have landed her the nickname in the national media the female Indiana Jones. 

After a record-breaking 780 days circling the Earth, the U.S. Air Force's mysterious X-37B unmanned space plane dropped out of orbit and landed safely on the same runway that the space shuttle once used.

It was the fifth acknowledged mission for the vehicle, built by Boeing at the aerospace company's Phantom Works.

The Nobel Prize in chemistry was awarded jointly to John B. Goodenough, M. Stanley Whittingham and Akira Yoshino for the development of lithium-ion batteries.

"Lithium-ion batteries have revolutionized our lives and are used in everything from mobile phones to laptops and electric vehicles," the Nobel Committee said. "Through their work, this year's Chemistry Laureates have laid the foundation of a wireless, fossil fuel-free society."

A new set of analyses published Monday in the Annals of Internal Medicine challenges the widespread recommendations to cut back on red and processed meats.

NOAA via AP

In the last week of August, the monster storm now known as Hurricane Dorian began its life as a bit of thunderstorm activity off the West African coast.

There's been a lot of excitement lately that the powerful gene-editing technique CRISPR could offer a new way to treat health problems ranging from cancer to blindness.

But there hasn't been much direct scientific evidence in actual patients about whether it might work or would be safe — until now.

Chinese scientists have published the first report in a scientific journal of an attempt to use CRISPR-edited cells in a patient--a 27-year-old man who is HIV-positive.

By the time a fetus is 6 months old, it is producing electrical signals recognizable as brain waves.

And clusters of lab-grown human brain cells known as organoids seem to follow a similar schedule, researchers reported Thursday in the journal Cell Stem Cell.

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