sea rise

Nancy Klingener / WLRN

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has released its plan to help the Florida Keys adapt to rising seas. The $5.4 billion plan would include elevating more than 7,000 homes and buying out almost 300.

Zoo Miami

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service plans to designate an area three times the size of Lake Okeechobee as critical habitat for Florida’s rare bonneted bat.

Ian Linder Sheldon

The rain that pounded South Florida last week, and dumped a half foot on Miami International Airport in just two hours, also tested the limits of the old Tamiami Canal.

AP

Among scientists, conveying uncertainty in predictions over sea rise, increasing temperatures and other impacts linked to climate change — without suggesting doubt — remains a nagging challenge.

Miami Herald archives

When Hurricane Irma made landfall in the Florida Keys in 2017, it sent a four- to six-foot storm surge to Biscayne Bay more than 100 miles away, flooding busy Brickell Avenue.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers now has a tentative plan to fix that: massive flood gates and walls that could include a two-mile stretch in the heart of downtown Miami.


AP

The city of Miami officially rolled out its plan to fight sea rise and tackle threats from climate change at a rooftop ceremony overlooking Biscayne Bay Thursday.

The plan follows a yearlong effort focused on five critical areas that included flooding, increasing heat and the goal of cutting carbon emissions. That effort led to 86 specific actions, said Resiliency Chief Jane Gilbert — from increasing insurance discounts for flood-weary residents to overhauling the city’s aging stormwater system.

Matias J. Ocner / Miami Herald

On a stretch of the Lower Keys, near an old borrow pit quarried during the construction of Big Pine, sea water and mud cover much of the rocky ground.

AP

Just after he entered the White House, President Donald Trump pulled out of the Paris Climate accord. It was only the most obvious rebuke of efforts to address climate change, that has since included ending a NASA carbon monitoring program and loosening regulations on air pollution.

Miami Herald archives

In his new book, "The Geography of Risk: Epic Storms, Rising Seas, and the Cost of America's Coast," Pulitzer-prize winning author Gilbert Gaul takes a look at the U.S. history of coastal development since World War II - and finds a recipe for disaster.

Jose A. Iglesias / El Nuevo Herald

North Bay Village, an island community literally scraped from the bottom of Biscayne Bay, now has a problem with waters that surround it.

Al Diaz/Miami Herald

If the past is any indication, worsening threats from climate change, like rising seas in South Florida, could take a larger toll on the poor as people are forced to abandon their homes.

Charles Trainor JR. /Miami Herald

A new United Nations climate report released in Monaco this week paints another grim picture for the planet and Florida.

Seas are not only rising, but accelerating and worsening flood threats.

Carl Juste/Miami Herald

Two years ago when Jennifer Cheek and her husband bought their tidy stucco house near the Little River with a rambling backyard - grand even by Miami standards - they thought they’d left behind the threat of devastating sea rise they faced in their Miami Beach neighborhood.

WLRN Lily Oppenheimer

Students across South Florida and the state will be skipping school Friday to join a nationwide youth climate strike

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