Jenny Staletovich

Environment Reporter

Jenny Staletovich has been a journalist working in Florida for nearly 20 years.

She’s reported on some of the region’s major environment stories, including the 2018 devastating red tide and blue-green algae blooms, impacts from climate change and Everglades restoration, the nation’s largest water restoration project. She’s also written about disappearing rare forests, invasive pythons, diseased coral and a host of other critical issues around the state.

She covered the environment, climate change and hurricanes for the Miami Herald for five years and previously freelanced for the paper. She worked at the Palm Beach Post from 1989 to 2000, covering crime, government and general assignment stories.

She has won several state and national awards including the Scripps Howard National Journalism Award for Distinguished Service to the First Amendment, the Green Eyeshades and the Sunshine State Awards.

Staletovich graduated from Smith College and lives in Miami, with her husband and their three children.

Ways to Connect

NOAA

New rules for the troubled reefs and turquoise waters that make up the vast marine sanctuary that surrounds the Florida Keys are threatening to spark a Conch-style uprising. 

Katie Lepri/WLRN

Some of the most dramatic sea rise around South Florida has occurred in the last two decades: at least five inches near Virginia Key since 1992.

PEDRO PORTAL / MIAMI HERALD

Gov. Ron DeSantis announced plans to propose sweeping legislation meant to address Florida's water woes in a press conference Wednesday outside a Jupiter sewage plant.

The proposals largely follow the recommendations of a panel of scientists DeSantis appointed in April - a sharp departure from his predecessor Rick Scott, who refused to meet with scientists. DeSantis said the broad measures will be aimed at the state’s biggest sources of pollution: farms, aging wastewater treatment plants, stormwater and treated human waste used as fertilizer.

WLRN archives

A weekend sewer spill at Miami-Dade County’s Virginia Key treatment plant triggered another round of beach warnings.

Al Diaz/Miami Herald

If the past is any indication, worsening threats from climate change, like rising seas in South Florida, could take a larger toll on the poor as people are forced to abandon their homes.

Pedro Portal Miami Herald

A state task force examining ways to fix Florida’s dirty water narrowed its recommendations on Monday by suggesting tighter rules for septic tanks and aging stormwater systems.

Wilfredo Lee/AP

Dirty beaches in the wake of record-setting king tides across South Florida this week should come as no surprise, scientists say.

“No, there’s not any coincidence,” said Florida International University geochemist and water quality expert Henry Briceno.

Just days after record-setting tides, Florida Department of Health officials issued warnings Thursday about unsafe levels of bacteria at four Miami-Dade County beaches: Crandon Park’s North Beach, Virginia Key, Cape Florida and Surfside at 93rd Street. They told swimmers to stay out of the water.

Miami Herald Archive

A lease on sugar farms at the center of dispute that pitted Gov. Ron DeSantis against South Florida water managers was cancelled Thursday.

DeSantis announced Florida Crystals terminated the lease on land slated for a 17,000-acre reservoir - a critical piece of Everglades restoration needed to provide water to southern marshes. The sugar farmers voluntarily cancelled the lease on Monday, he said.

Charles Trainor JR. /Miami Herald

A new United Nations climate report released in Monaco this week paints another grim picture for the planet and Florida.

Seas are not only rising, but accelerating and worsening flood threats.

Associated Press

Scientists on Florida’s blue green algae task force began the daunting task this week of trying to craft recommendations for how to fix the state’s complex water problems.

Emily Michot Miami Herald

A King Tide forecast for the weekend could bring flooding to parts of South Florida.

The tide is expected to peak Sunday and Monday mornings between about 9 and 10 a.m. and may approach record highs as the moon sweeps closer to the earth.

"They do look like they'll be roughly comparable to the highest tide we saw in 2015 and 2016, which were pretty noteworthy," said Brian McNoldy, a hurricane researcher who tracks the tides at the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science.

Carl Juste/Miami Herald

Two years ago when Jennifer Cheek and her husband bought their tidy stucco house near the Little River with a rambling backyard - grand even by Miami standards - they thought they’d left behind the threat of devastating sea rise they faced in their Miami Beach neighborhood.

Gabriela Camacho WLRN

Miami youths frustrated with the pace of efforts to address climate change have a message for adults: We're starting a revolution.

At a rally outside Miami Beach City Hall on Friday — one of dozens around the state and hundreds across the nation — protesters waved signs, chanted and expressed outrage at the lack of action. The rally was organized by local students and adults and part of the strikewithus.org effort sponsored by about 300 organizations.

WLRN Lily Oppenheimer

Students across South Florida and the state will be skipping school Friday to join a nationwide youth climate strike

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