Jenny Staletovich

Environment Reporter

Jenny Staletovich has been a journalist working in Florida for nearly 20 years.

She’s reported on some of the region’s major environment stories, including the 2018 devastating red tide and blue-green algae blooms, impacts from climate change and Everglades restoration, the nation’s largest water restoration project. She’s also written about disappearing rare forests, invasive pythons, diseased coral and a host of other critical issues around the state.

She covered the environment, climate change and hurricanes for the Miami Herald for five years and previously freelanced for the paper. She worked at the Palm Beach Post from 1989 to 2000, covering crime, government and general assignment stories.

She has won several state and national awards including the Scripps Howard National Journalism Award for Distinguished Service to the First Amendment, the Green Eyeshades and the Sunshine State Awards.

Staletovich graduated from Smith College and lives in Miami, with her husband and their three children.

Ways to Connect

NOAA

Florida has an underappreciated secret weapon to help heal its ailing reefs: prickly sea urchins.

Steve Rothaus/Miami Herald

New sea level rise projections for South Florida show an alarming trend: higher waters are coming faster than previously expected.

According to the Southeast Florida Climate Compact, seas could rise between one foot and two-and-a-half feet by 2060 – two to five inches more than 2015 projections.

Emily Michot / Miami Herald

The Nuclear Regulatory Agency granted two controversial license extensions to Turkey Point’s aging nuclear reactors on Thursday.

The 20-year extensions - which extend the life of the reactors to 80 - are the first of their kind in the U.S.

Miami Herald archives

Florida is sending $25 million to South Florida to buy out homeowners ready to surrender to hurricanes and rising seas.

On Tuesday, the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity awarded $44 million in Hurricane Irma relief money to cities and counties around the state to purchase vulnerable property in an attempt to cut the cost of future damage. In South Florida, Monroe County will receive the lion’s share - $15 million - with another $5 million going to Marathon, about $4.5 million to Miami-Dade County and just over $200,000 to the Village of Islamorada.

WLRN archive

Miami is hot. But not in a good way.

Steamy heat is putting the glammy city on track to come very close to breaking the all-time record for high temperatures set two years ago.

Gonzalo Gaudenzi / AP

The 2019 Atlantic hurricane season officially wraps up Saturday, ending another above-average season that packed lethal power.

Jim Bennight / @JimBennightPhotographer

A lethal Gulf Coast red tide that littered beaches with dead wildlife in 2018 is back and this time around, it's claiming one of North America's rarest bird species.

Miami Herald archives

In his new book, "The Geography of Risk: Epic Storms, Rising Seas, and the Cost of America's Coast," Pulitzer-prize winning author Gilbert Gaul takes a look at the U.S. history of coastal development since World War II - and finds a recipe for disaster.

Pedro Portal / Miami Herald

Floridians have until Friday to weigh in on whether the state should set limits for toxic algae in water.

Florida is required to conduct reviews of water quality standards every three years under the federal Clean Water Act. This year, the state’s blue green algae task force and environmentalists have been lobbying for standards to address regular toxic outbreaks in the St. Lucie, Caloosahatchee and other Florida waterways.

Charles Trainor JR. /Miami Herald

A push by South Florida builders to expand future growth onto Miami-Dade County farm fields survived a critical vote Monday night.

The county’s Planning Advisory Council, which recommends changes to the county’s master growth plan, sided with builders and agreed not to endorse a report that would have protected land west of Kendall. The area is also targeted for the expansion of the 836/Dolphin Expressway.

Instead, council members said they want to keep the land in play.

Maureen Tan/Fairchild Tropical Botanical Garden

Sometimes the best science comes from an idle, casual observation. Take Isaac Newton. Or Josh Diamond.

Jenny Staletovich/WLRN

A stand-off between Florida’s Indian tribes and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is threatening to derail work to restore more than a half million acres of swamps and marshes.

Charles Trainor JR. /Miami Herald

South Florida builders are pushing to strip protection from farmland near the Everglades - and the controversial extension of the Dolphin Expressway - to open it up to future expansion.

The land sits outside the urban development boundary,  the line drawn to protect farm fields and wetlands - and is part of an area designated for future growth.

NOAA

New rules for the troubled reefs and turquoise waters that make up the vast marine sanctuary that surrounds the Florida Keys are threatening to spark a Conch-style uprising. 

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