tourism

Eric Barton

In the 1980s, after the bolívar crashed and Venezuelans suddenly couldn’t fly to Miami every weekend, a gaita band recorded a sardonic song whose chorus lamented, "Qué triste domingo sin Miami Beach."

How sad Sunday is without Miami Beach.

How The Federal Shutdown Affects South Florida

Oct 11, 2013

Payday comes and goes with pinched paychecks for thousands of federal government workers, as the partial U.S. government shutdown continues. We look at how South Florida, from Palm Beach to the Keys, is dealing with it.

Fail once, try, try again. The state takes a second swing at purging voter rolls.

And in this odd-year election season, we look at some local races and ballot questions - and the big drama at Doral City Hall.

WALTER MICHOT / Miami Herald Staff

Getting out on the open sea, wind in your hair, enjoying the ride with your family and friends. Then there’s the boat payments, storage fees, fuel, maintenance and repair — these costs can quickly sink the dream of boat ownership.

Ahoy, mates — a new breed of boat-sharing services is entering the hot South Florida boating market. San Francisco-based Boatbound.co set up its East Coast headquarters on the Rickenbacker Causeway in Key Biscayne and launched nationally in June.

Raj Chetty, Nathaniel Hendren, Patrick Kline, Emmanuel Saez / http://www.equality-of-opportunity.org/

Children from low income families in Florida have the best chance of achieving a higher income level if they grow up in Miami.

Surprised?

I was.  Based on my layman's understanding, I thought we would have low rates of income mobility.

Add this to the list of damages done in recent years to important pieces of art:

"An American tourist in Italy has generated shock and outrage by snapping the finger off a 600-year-old statue at a museum in Florence." (NBC News)

The fragile architectural treasures of Venice are endangered by rising sea levels, and a growing number of critics now say the city and its canals are at risk from massive cruise ships as big as floating skyscrapers.

On an average day, tens of thousands of passengers lean over the railings of cruise ships that can be 300 yards long and 15 stories high. The tourists peer down at the majestic Doge's Palace as they sail into St. Mark's basin and down the Giudecca canal.

Isabel Echarte / WLRN

Meet REX, Florida’s newest roadside attraction. Set to be unveiled in September, the nine-foot-tall robot will have the friendly look of a massive children’s toy once local artist Mike Rivamonte finishes it.

http://www.elizabethbecker.com


http://en.wikipedia.org

Thursday was a big day for one of the largest publicly traded companies in South Florida.

Miami-based Carnival Corporation sent back to sea one of its more storied vessels: The Carnival Triumph.

In February an engine fire knocked out the Triumph’s power. No one was injured, but passengers complained of food shortages and a lack of working toilets.

Rick Stone

Exxxotica should be a familiar word to any South Floridian who regularly reads a "What to Do This Weekend" column.

It's a big sex-and-pornography convention that's been bringing fans annually to the Miami Beach Convention Center for the last seven years. But after a souring relationship with Miami Beach -- and a conclusion that Fort Lauderdale offers a much richer vein of porn consumers -- Exxxotica has moved to the Broward Convention Center where its inaugural weekend is underway.

WLRN

Tourism has been the fuel for South Florida's economy since Henry Flagler stretched his railroad to Palm Beach in the 1890s. It remains a significant and long-term driver of the local economy to this day.

Our program starts where Henry Flagler ignited the industry, at The Breakers in Palm Beach. The Breakers CEO Paul Leone tells us his resort has never been busier, even as it gears up for the "slow season" (which isn't slow.)

Alicia Zuckerman

It’s a time-honored tradition. Spring breakers descend on Miami from across the nation this time of year to guzzle beer, work on their tanlines and hit the clubs.


Or there’s Alternative Spring Break, where you sit in a windowless room, guzzle coffee, and fill out reams of immigration paperwork. You can compile proof of residence, and file for fee waivers. Sound appealing?

Florida gets about 87 million visitors a year. The nonprofit research group Florida Taxwatch wanted to know what would happen to the economy if that number reached 100 million.

The group did a study. The results suggest 121-thousand jobs would be created and other good things would happen to the economy.

So, the report recommends that the Legislature allocate more money for advertising.

Flickr/breezy421

Some South Florida cities were born beaches -- others just kind of decided to become beaches.

In recent years, several cities have attempted to raise their profiles and attract tourists by tacking a "Beach" onto the end of their names.

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