Tom Hudson

Vice president of news and special correspondent

In a journalism career covering news from high global finance to neighborhood infrastructure, Tom Hudson is the Vice President of News and Special Correspondent for WLRN.  He hosts and produces the Sunshine Economy and anchors the Florida Roundup in addition to leading the organization's news engagement strategy.

Hudson was most recently the co-anchor and managing editor of Nightly Business Report on Public Television. In that position Hudson reported on topics such as Federal Reserve interest rate policy, agriculture and global trade. Prior to co-anchoring NBR, he was host and managing editor of the nationally syndicated financial television program “First Business.” He overhauled the existing program leading to a 20 percent increase in distribution in his first year with the program.

Tom also reported and anchored market coverage for the groundbreaking web-based financial news service, WebFN. Beginning in 2001, WebFN was among the first live online streaming video outlets. While there he reported regularly from the Chicago Board Options Exchange, Chicago Board of Trade and the CME. Additionally, he created original business news and information programming for the investor channel of a large e-brokerage firm distributed to six large market CBS Radio stations. 

Before his jump to television and broadband, Tom co-anchored morning drive for the former all-news, heritage 50kw WMAQ-AM/Chicago. He spent the better part of a decade in general news as anchor, reporter, manager and talk show host in several markets covering a wide variety of stories and topics.

He has served as a member of the adjunct faculty in the Journalism Department of Columbia College Chicago and has been a frequent guest on other TV and radio programs as well as a guest speaker at universities on communications, journalism and business.

Tom writes a weekly column for the Miami Herald and the McClatchy-Tribune News Service. He appears regularly on KNX-AM/Los Angeles and WBBM-AM/Chicago for commentary on the economy and investment markets.

While Tom was co-anchoring and managing NBR, the program was awarded the 2012 Program of Excellence Award by American Public Television. Tom also has been awarded two National Press Foundation fellowships including one for the Wharton Seminars for Business Journalists in 2006. He graduated Phi Beta Kappa from the University of Iowa and is the recipient of several professional honors and awards for his work in journalism.

He is married with two boys who tend to wake up early on the weekends.

Ways to Connect

AP Photo/Brynn Anderson

Jack McCabe is scared. 

McCabe was one of the earliest voices warning of the housing collapse 13 years ago. He runs a real estate economic consulting firm based in Deerfield Beach that bears his name. As early as 2005, McCabe was sounding alarms of a slowing housing market in South Florida. 

 

Of course, It didn’t just slow — it collapsed.

 

Matias Ocner / Miami Herald

Many businesses have closed to try to slow the spread of the coronavirus.

Local governments and the state are allowing some essential services to remain open. That includes grocery stores, pharmacies and other places needed to keep cities and towns running.

courtesy: Keys News Service

Fifty percent unemployment? 

That's the guess from Monroe County Administrator Roman Gastesi. 

Ted S. Warren / AP

South Florida is a coronavirus hotspot in the state. The majority of confirmed cases in Florida are in Broward, Miami-Dade and Palm Beach counties.

Courtesy of Edgar Leal

The sounds bounced off walls in empty restaurant dining rooms and cafes.

Lynne Sladky / AP Photo

Some beaches have closed. Cruise ships are docked. Airlines have grounded some planes. Disney and Universal in Orlando are closed. Local attractions are shut down. Theaters are dark. Hotel reservations are cancelled. Restaurants and bars are closing early.

This business hasn’t slowed. In many cases it has stopped.

Andre Penner / AP via Miami Herald

Coronavirus cases continue growing across South Florida.  More were found in Broward County. The first few cases were also recently confirmed in Miami-Dade and Palm Beach counties.

CDC

Florida’s large population of senior citizens and people without health insurance make the state vulnerable to the threat posed by an outbreak of COVID-19. The number of cases in the state remain relatively small, but it has been growing as testing for the virus has grown.

doctor
Flickr Creative Commons/Hamza Butt / WLRN

Florida health officials are continuing to monitor the spread of coronavirus. According to the Florida Department of Health, 264 people are currently under public health monitoring, which means they are at risk of having been exposed to COVID-19. 

There have been several cases in the state of Florida that have tested positive for the virus so far.

Marta Lavandier / AP Photo

Jay Foreman is no stranger to China and the global supply chain. He runs Basic Fun, based in Boca Raton. It imports toys like My Little Pony Classic and Pound Puppies from China. A dozen Basic Fun employees work in China and 65 work in Hong Kong.

Matt Rourke / AP

For many folks in South Florida and across the country, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders' comments about Cuba touched a raw nerve. 
During a 60 Minutes interview that aired Sunday, Sanders praised the education and health care programs of Fidel Castro, while saying he is "very opposed to the authoritarian nature of Cuba." 

Daniel A. Varela / Miami Herald

Traffic is a perennial problem across South Florida. It costs time, and money—if you use toll roads or express lanes. 

This week, the state announced some changes to the Palmetto Expressway, State Road 826, in Miami-Dade County. The Florida Department of Transportation will reduce the number of express lanes on the 826. Tolls will also be suspended as the project gets under way.

 

Lynne Sladky / AP Photo

The quiet season is about half over. The time between Nov. 30 and June 1 is usually quiet in the tropics. The six months between June and November is hurricane season in the Atlantic Ocean. And the last few seasons have been reminders about the threats posed to Florida.

 

Susan Stocker / South Florida Sun Sentinel

Pipes in Fort Lauderdale keep breaking--it's been an almost daily reality for many people living and working in the city.

More than 200 million gallons of sewage have spilled from busted pipes in Fort Lauderdale since December.

 

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