TPS

C.M. GUERRERO / Miami Herald

Carlos Curbelo is considering a run for Miami-Dade Mayor in 2020. 

Miami native, son of Cuban exiles and former Republican Representative from Florida’s 26th District (2015-2018), Curbelo is no stranger to politics. In the November 2018 elections he went against Democrat Debbie Murcasel-Powell and executed one of the most expensive U.S. House races in the country. Mucarsel-Powell defeated Curbelo in a close and contested race.

AP Photo/Evan Vucci

President Donald Trump said his administration is considering granting Temporary Protected Status to thousands of Venezuelans who have fled to the United States amid ongoing unrest.

The once-wealthy oil nation is now facing severe shortages of basic goods and hyperinflation. Trump said the situation in Venezuela is a horrible thing that’s “been brewing for a long time.”

Temporary Protected Status is granted to people from countries ravaged by natural disasters or war and lets them remain in the U.S. until the situation improves back home.

Alexia Fodere / Miami Herald

Accusing the Trump administration of being motivated by politics and not facts, a second U.S. federal judge is blocking the U.S. Department of Homeland Security from forcing tens of thousands of Haitians to return to Haiti by ending their temporary legal protection.

AL DIAZ / Maimi Herald

Tens of thousands of Haitians with Temporary Protected Status (TPS) have been granted more time to stay in the Sunshine State, at least for now. TPS was extended this week for four groups in the U.S. – Salvadorans, Hondurans, Sudanese and Haitians. That will allow TPS holders from those countries to remain in the U.S. until Jan. 2, 2020.

Jose A. Iglesias / El Nuevo Herald

On Wednesday, Venezuelans in South Florida and in Venezuela plan mass marches to protest their authoritarian regime. One of Miami’s new congresswomen returned to town on Tuesday today to host a roundtable on the crisis and discuss solutions.

Tim Padgett / WLRN.org

Venezuela’s humanitarian and human rights crisis is one of the worst South America has ever seen. So a Miami lawmaker helped introduce a bill in Congress Thursday to protect Venezuelans living here from being deported back.

Two decades ago, Maria Rivas emigrated from El Salvador to the United States, where she received temporary protected status (TPS) allowing her to stay and legally work.

But later this year, TPS – a humanitarian program — is set to expire for nearly 200,000 immigrants from El Salvador, including Rivas. If forced to leave the U.S., Maria won't take her U.S.-born daughter, Emily, with her.

EMILY MICHOT / MIAMI HERALD

For Miami Archbishop Thomas Wenski, the issue of immigration is close to his heart. 

For more than four decades, Wenski has worked closely with South Florida’s immigrant community. He regularly makes trips to Latin America and Haiti to celebrate Mass and provide religious services. Recently, Wenski traveled to Chile to work with Haitian and Venezuelan migrants living in the country.  Earlier this year, he went to Congress along with several El Salvadorian ministers to advocate on behalf of temporary protected status holders (TPS).

Sam Turken / WLRN

South Florida Democrats said Monday the U.S. must increase pressure on the Venezuelan government to end a devastating humanitarian crisis that has forced millions of people to flee the country.

Rampant inflation and corruption has left Venezuela with dire shortages of food, water, medical supplies and electricity. During a roundtable discussion with Venezuelan community activists in Sunrise, Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz said the U.S. has given the crisis limited attention.

JOSE A. IGLESIAS / MIAMI HERALD

Last month, Democrat Donna Shalala won a long-held Republican congressional seat after advocating strongly for laws that protect immigrants from Venezuela and Nicaragua who are living in the United States.

Shalala would like to extend Temporary Protected Status, or TPS, for immigrants from Nicaragua and Venezuela. Under the immigration status, which is granted due to conflict, natural disaster or other extraordinary conditions, those with TPS can temporarily live and work legally in the United States and be protected from deportation.

TIm Padgett / WLRN.org

Earlier this month, a federal judge blocked the Trump administration’s efforts to end Temporary Protected Status, or TPS, for 300,000 immigrants. A nationwide bus tour urging Congress to pass a more permanent solution made a stop  Wednesday in Little Haiti.

A federal court in California has blocked the Trump administration from terminating the Temporary Protected Status program that allows immigrants from four countries to live and work in the United States.

The ruling issued late Wednesday by U.S. District Judge Edward M. Chen Wednesday affects more than 300,000 immigrants enrolled in TPS from El Salvador, Nicaragua, Haiti and Sudan.

TPS was created by Congress in 1990 to allow people from countries suffering civil conflict or natural disasters to remain in the U.S. temporarily.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is stirring panic in immigrant communities by moving to limit who can get asylum in the United States. Perhaps no one is more alarmed than one Salvadoran woman living in the Carolinas.

She is known only by her initials in immigration court papers, so her lawyers call her Ms. A.B. She fled to the U.S. four years ago, after enduring more than a decade of domestic abuse in her home country, and requested asylum here.

Miami Herald reporter Doug Hanks has been following closely the race to represent District 5 at the Miami-Dade County Commission. This is the first time in 20 years the seat has opened. Hanks talked to Sundial about the candidates, their platforms and the significance of this race.

List of voting place for District 5 on May 22 can be found here.

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