Victims of Gun Violence Talk About What Comes After 'March For Our Lives'

Mar 19, 2018

South Florida Congresswoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz hosted a roundtable on Monday to discuss how to keep the momentum for gun control going long after this coming Saturday's "March For Our Lives," organized by Parkland students with support from their peers around the country. 

The panel was a follow-up to a gun safety roundtable that Wasserman Schultz held earlier this month.

 

 

 

 

At the city of Sunrise police station, the congresswoman gathered faith leaders, Broward County government officials, former NRA members and Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School students for the second time since the Feb. 14 shooting that killed 17 people. 

“This doesn’t end next Saturday with the March For Our Lives. The March For Our Lives should be looked at as a beginning,” the congresswoman said.

The goal of the roundtable is to discuss solutions that can be eventually written into a federal gun control bill.

Fred Guttenberg spoke about his gun control advocacy efforts after his daughter Jaime was killed in the Parkland shooting.

“All you need to do is invite me to any conversation, on either side of this issue, as long as you agree we will talk about guns,” Gutenberg said.

Megan Hobson was hit by a stray bullet in a Miami Gardens drive-by in 2012. She sat on the panel, and spoke out afterwards against complacency toward gun violence.

“You might not look at your kids and see some of the kids that have been affected by this,” Hobson said. “But at the end of the day, you have to still have that consciousness and know that bullets also have no eyes.”

Several members of the panel, including Wasserman Schultz, will be in Washington D.C. on Saturday, March 24, for the national "March For Our Lives."