100 Resilient Cities

Al Diaz / Miami Herald

After two and a half years of work, a comprehensive report on how to better prepare Miami for all kinds of threats -- economic, health and especially climate risks -- is expected to be released by the end of May.

The effort aims to better understand the risks to resiliency. That is the popular word used as a catchall for everything from dealing with housing affordability to recovering after a hurricane to protecting against and adapting to rising seas.

Arianna Prothero / WLRN

An international program that has helped South Florida cities address climate change and other livability challenges is ending. 

Kate Stein / WLRN

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is starting a three-year, $3 million study to help Miami-Dade County find ways to reduce risk from storms and sea-level rise.

On Thursday, the Corps and the county launched the effort by collecting ideas from local planners, researchers and concerned citizens. For four hours, staff members sat at tables in the Miami Rowing Club on Key Biscayne and facilitated conversations with interested members of the public.

Alejandra Martinez / WLRN

Global warming can feel like an overwhelming problem -- it is, after all, GLOBAL -- but many of the solutions already exist.

That was the message from one of the keynote speakers of what's been dubbed "Climate Week" in South Florida.

C.M. Guerrero / Miami Herald

Miami's mayor is joining a list of big names on a new international climate change commission.

Mayor Francis Suarez will be part of a new "Global Commission on Adaptation," led by Bill Gates, former United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon and current World Bank CEO Kristalina Georgieva.

The commission includes 28 leaders from government, business and non-profits. They represent countries including the Marshall Islands -- one of the nations most at risk of having to relocate because of sea-level rise.

Riane Roldan / WLRN

There's a buzzword among people who work on quality-of-life issues in South Florida: "Resilience."

It’s a concept we often apply to a person, someone who's able to cope with difficult circumstances. But more and more, the word is being used in the context of how communities respond to issues like traffic, hurricanes, affordable housing and rising seas.

Florida Center for Environmental Studies

If you thought sea-level rise was the greatest immediate threat to South Florida’s future, you may need to think again.

There’s growing concern that the perception of the sea-level rise threat by insurers, banks and investors might submerge South Florida before rising seas do.

Kate Stein / WLRN

In one of Miami-Dade’s most flood-prone areas, county officials on Thursday night collected public input on what to do about water from storms and and rising seas.

Andres Rivero / Courtesy of Miami Mayor's Office

Rowan Douglas feels an emotional draw to statistical risk modeling of natural disasters.

"Two hundred years ago, we created the romantic period of English literature, where man became connected to nature," the executive said. "We are now connecting to nature again, through the majesty of the modeled world."

Kate Stein / WLRN

Global warming is likely contributing to record-breaking heat in South Florida: 2015 and 2017 tied for the hottest year since regional record-keeping began in the 1800s, and temperatures in the early part of 2018 are setting records, too.

Kate Stein / WLRN

The new mayors of Miami and Miami Beach received updates Monday on their cities' participation in the 100 Resilient Cities program to address present and future livability challenges in Greater Miami and the Beaches.

Kate Stein / WLRN

Southeast Florida has a new plan to help communities deal with sea level rise.

Al Diaz / Miami Herald

Miami-Dade needs a community-wide "culture of resilience" before the next hurricane, a county commissioner argued in a new report.

"Every individual, every household needs to have an emergency plan. And that plan needs to be communicated with somebody who’s a lifeline," Commissioner Daniella Levine Cava wrote in the report on Hurricane Irma.

Carl Juste / Miami Herald

The next steps for the $400 million bond issue approved by city of Miami voters on Tuesday include developing criteria for selecting livability projects, officials championing the bond say.

"The city will not be purchasing any bonds until projects are actually not only decided but underway," said Jane Gilbert, Miami's chief resilience officer, adding that "underway" means shovels in the ground.

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