2018 election

Caitie Switalski / WLRN News

If you voted provisionally on Election Day, you have until 5 p.m. today to prove you were eligible to vote and have your vote counted.

Provisional votes can be somewhat described as "purgatory votes" -- votes cast by people who were not immediately able to prove their eligibility to vote. Until the voter submits proof that they are eligible to vote where they did, the votes do not count.

Florida Waiting For Broward, Palm Beach Counties In Vote Count

Nov 8, 2018
Carline Jean / South Florida Sun Sentinel

Broward and Palm Beach County elections officials were still counting votes on Thursday morning, and questions continued about why more than 24,000 people voted for governor but not Senate in Broward.

The elections office counted 22,000 ballots Wednesday, continuing late into the night. In total, more than 695,700 Broward ballots were counted by 1 a.m. Thursday.

MATIAS J. OCNER / Miami Herald

As the U.S. Senate race between Gov. Rick Scott and Sen. Bill Nelson appears headed to a statewide recount, both candidates are mobilizing teams of lawyers and legal skirmishes are well underway.

Voter turnout on Tuesday was massive: More than 47 percent of the voting-eligible population cast a ballot in the midterm elections on Tuesday, according to early estimates from the United States Election Project.

"Almost half of possible voters actually voted" might not sound impressive. But for a U.S. midterm election, it's a whopping figure. Compare that with just 36.7 percent in 2014, and 41 percent in 2010.

That's the highest turnout for a midterm since 1966, when 49 percent of the population showed up to vote.

Turnout on 2018 Midterm Elections Tops 62 Percent In Florida

Nov 7, 2018
Voting
Jessica Meszaros / WLRN

With wide variations throughout the state, 62.1 percent of Florida voters cast ballots in Tuesday’s mid-term elections, according to numbers posted on the state Division of Elections website.

The highest turnout, nearly 77.7 percent, came in Sumter County, which includes a large part of the massive Villages retirement community. Other counties with the highest turnout rates included Jefferson County at 75.6 percent; Collier County at nearly 73.5 percent; Franklin County at 70.8 percent; and St. Johns County at 70.3 percent.

Updated 4:37 p.m. ET

Incumbent Sen. Bill Nelson in Florida is calling for a recount in a razor-thin race with Republican Rick Scott, the state's outgoing governor.

Scott is up by about 34,000 votes out of 8.1 million cast. That's within the half-percent margin that launches an automatic recount in Florida.

Scott claimed victory Tuesday night. But Nelson is not conceding. In a statement, Nelson said, "We are proceeding to a recount."

Nelson's campaign estimates that there are more than 100,000 ballots left to be counted.

Susan Stocker / South Florida Sun Sentinel / WLRN

More than two hours after the polls closed in most of Florida, the marquee races — for governor and U.S. Senate were too close to call.

The Florida Roundup / WLRN

This post was updated with new information at 12:00 p.m., Nov. 7, 2018.

In the race to be Florida's next Commissioner of Agriculture, at first it looked like Republican state Rep. Matt Caldwell narrowly beat out Democratic candidate Nikki Fried.

Caldwell had claimed victory at his election watch party in North Fort Myers. 

But now, the race is too close to call and will be going into a manual recount.

After 11:30 a.m. Wednesday morning, just over than 12,000 votes separated the candidates. That means Fried and Caldwell are 0.16 percent apart.

Scott-Nelson Senate Race Could Require A Recount

Nov 7, 2018
Wilfredo Lee / Associated Press

Although Gov. Rick Scott declared victory late Tuesday in his race for a U.S. Senate seat, numbers posted Wednesday morning on the Florida Division of Elections website indicate a recount could be needed.

The updated numbers showed Scott with 4,074,001 votes, or 50.21 percent, while Democratic incumbent Bill Nelson had 4,039,498 votes, or 49.79 percent. Under state law, a recount is triggered when the margin is 0.5 percent or less.

Such a recount would involve running ballots through tabulating machines to determine the accuracy of the vote totals, according to state law.

Note: NPR will be updating these numbers as more results come in.

Updated at 10:44 a.m. ET Thursday

After Tuesday's elections, a record number of women will serve in Congress come January 2019.

With results still coming in, 98 women have won their House races as of early Wednesday morning, up from the current 84. In addition, at least 13 women won Senate seats. That's in addition to the 10 female senators who were not up for re-election this year.

There are a lot of different ways to read the results from elections across the country Tuesday.

There will be lots of spin in the coming days about what it all means, but here are seven ways to cut through the noise and put what happened in context:

1. It was a Democratic wave in the House, and that is a very big deal.

Rick Scott Edges Bill Nelson To Win U.S. Senate Seat In Tight, Historic Race

Nov 7, 2018
Wilfredo Lee / Associated Press

Rick Scott did it again.

Powered by a highly-motivated Republican turnout and another $60 million from his vast personal fortune, Gov. Scott clinched a seat in the U.S. Senate on Tuesday and dislodged deeply-entrenched Democrat Bill Nelson from office.

Despite a record turnout for a Florida midterm election and widespread predictions of a Democratic “blue wave,” Scott won his third straight statewide election.

As of midnight, Scott led Nelson by about 56,000 votes, strikingly close to his 2014 victory by 64,165.

Jimmy Patronis Wins Full Term As Florida's CFO

Nov 6, 2018
Tampa Bay Times via Miami Herald

After being appointed as state chief financial officer last year by Gov. Rick Scott, Republican Jimmy Patronis on Tuesday won a four-year term in the Cabinet post.

Patronis, whose focus during the final weeks of the campaign was diverted to his hometown of Panama City after Hurricane Michael hit, defeated former state Sen. Jeremy Ring, a Broward County Democrat.

Patronis had received about 52 percent of the vote as of 11 p.m., according to the state Division of Elections.

Updated at 1:55 p.m. ET Thursday

With women making up only 20 percent of Congress, there are many types of women — especially women of color — who have never been represented on Capitol Hill. The record-breaking wave of female candidates in 2018 comes with a list of firsts among those women. Here's a list of some of those firsts, which we will keep updating as results come in.

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