climate change

Miami Herald archives

Floridians have another year of reprieve before they face a likely hike in their flood insurance premiums, thanks to political pressure from Congress over a potentially drastic revamp to the National Flood Insurance Program.

The planned change to the way the NFIP charges policyholders is meant to claw the program out of its multibillion-dollar debts and help the nation adapt to the growing risk of climate change — in exchange for an end to the subsidies coastal residents have relied on for decades.

BAYVIEW HOMES

The last time the Florida building code changed, it required any new construction along the coast to elevate buildings a whole foot. Just three years later, that doesn’t look like enough. There’s a call to go up yet another foot.

Tiffany Tompkins / Bradenton Herald

From the Unconditional Surrender monument in Sarasota to the parliament in Sweden, the world’s youth are holding weekly protests and highlighting the realities of climate change, a topic of growing importance to young men and women.

Stephanie Russo / Monroe County

There's a big pot of money coming to Florida from the federal government to help communities hit hard by recent hurricanes be more resilient in future storms. The Keys are making the case for a good chunk of that money.

The Trump administration has formally notified the United Nations that the U.S. is withdrawing from the Paris climate agreement. The withdrawal will be complete this time next year, after a one-year waiting period has elapsed.

"We will continue to work with our global partners to enhance resilience to the impacts of climate change and prepare for and respond to natural disasters," Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said in a statement Monday.

Brent Stirton / National Geographic

National Geographic Cuban-American explorer Mireya Mayor has returned to her hometown of Miami. The former Miami Dolphins cheerleader has traveled to the most remote places of the world like Madagascar and the Congo. Mayor has swum with sharks, been chased by elephants, bitten by poisonous bugs and charged by gorillas. Her adventures have landed her the nickname in the national media the female Indiana Jones. 

Teenage environmental activist Greta Thunberg has turned down a major environmental prize.

"It is a huge honor," Thunberg said of the Nordic Council Environment Prize. "But the climate movement does not need any more awards."

"What we need is for our politicians and the people in power to start listening to the current, best available science," she added.

The award Thunberg rejected came with prize money of 350,000 Danish kroner — about $52,000.

Taimy Alvarez / South Florida Sun Sentinel

More than two thirds of Florida adults consider climate change a threat to future generations and say state and local governments should do more to address it, according to a poll released Monday by Florida Atlantic University.

NOAA

New rules for the troubled reefs and turquoise waters that make up the vast marine sanctuary that surrounds the Florida Keys are threatening to spark a Conch-style uprising. 

Jose A. Iglesias / El Nuevo Herald

North Bay Village, an island community literally scraped from the bottom of Biscayne Bay, now has a problem with waters that surround it.

Ellis Rua / Associated Press

Florida’s Republican lawmakers are looking at new ways to address climate change in the state.  It’s part of a shift in policy when it comes to addressing environmental issues.  The sea change comes as younger republicans ditch old policies, which included not even using the words climate change.

Katie Lepri/WLRN

Some of the most dramatic sea rise around South Florida has occurred in the last two decades: at least five inches near Virginia Key since 1992.

Nirmal Mulaikal / WLRN News

South Florida artists and performers came together Thursday night to fight climate change at The Frank art gallery in Pembroke Pines. 

The exhibit, known as “Art for the Earth: Artists on Climate Change”, featured a theatrical performance, visual artwork and spoken poetry. 

 

Florida lawmakers Monday dug into issues involving climate change and greenhouse gas emissions, phrases mostly kept under wraps by state Republican leaders before last year’s elections.

Walter Michot / Miami Herald

Pollution from auto emissions has gone up 55 percent in the Tampa Bay area since 1990, according to a nationwide analysis the New York Times published last week.

The numbers are nearly the same or worse for other parts of the state during that time period: a 53 percent increase in the Jacksonville area; 58 percent in the Dade-Broward region; 61 percent in the Sarasota-Bradenton area; 98 percent in the Orlando region; and a whopping 126 percent in Naples.

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