climate change

Anastasia Samoylova

Since 2016, Russian-American photographer Anastasia Samoylova has been capturing images of sea-level rise in South Florida in quiet — and often surprising — ways.

youth climate change
Caitie Switalski / WLRN

About 1,000 middle and high school students and teachers from 27 schools came together for the second annual Broward Youth Climate Summit in Fort Lauderdale. 

Students had the chance to participate in a Broward County version of 'Game of Floods,' an interactive scenario. They also heard panels on how sea level rise will impact politics, art, economics, law and how they can advocate for policy change. The day-long event took place at the Museum of Discovery and Science.

 

South Beach Jazz Festival

Happy New Year Sundialers, here’s a rundown of the Thursday, Jan. 2, episode of Sundial:

Tampa Bay Times’ Investigation Looks At The ‘Baker Act’

The Tampa Bay Times recently released an investigation about the ‘Baker Act,’ the Florida law that allows families to involuntarily institutionalize people considered impaired because of mental illness. The investigation revealed that the law is impacting children as young as 6 throughout Florida. 

AP

Just after he entered the White House, President Donald Trump pulled out of the Paris Climate accord. It was only the most obvious rebuke of efforts to address climate change, that has since included ending a NASA carbon monitoring program and loosening regulations on air pollution.

WLRN archives

Miami can claim yet another climate title: hottest year on record in a three-way tie with 2015 and 2017.

Steamy high temps for the year averaged 79.1 degrees, according to Brian McNoldy, a Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science researcher who tracks climate-related conditions at the University of Miami’s Virginia Key campus.

"All three years are now tied for first place," McNoldy said. "We ended up about two degrees Fahrenheit above the average, which is a big offset."

Rodrigo Abd / AP

It's hard to wrap your arms around everything that happened 2019 in Latin America and the Caribbean. It's even harder to find any good news — from the violent political unrest that rocked capitals from La Paz to Port-au-Prince, to a record number of fires that ravaged the Amazon rainforest.

Walter Michot / Miami Herald

The environment will likely be a top story in Florida in the upcoming year. 2019 has been one of the hottest on record. King tides were some of the highest recorded. And, while Hurricane Dorian skirted along the Atlantic coast, it was a reminder of how vulnerable Florida is as climate change fuels more intense and wetter storms.

NOAA

Hurricane Dorian stands out as one of the biggest news stories of 2019.

The ominous Category 5 storm threatened South Florida for days. While the region escaped its destruction, the storm stalled over the northern Bahamas, scouring the islands with high winds and storm surge.

Carl Juste / Miami Herald

Congress has passed two spending bills to fund the federal government. President Donald Trump is expected to sign them, avoiding a shutdown.

One provision in those bills is a reauthorization of the National Flood Insurance Program. With the president's approval, the program will be extended through Sept. 30, 2020.

THE OCEAN AGENCY

On this Tuesday, Dec. 17, episode of Sundial:

Shores Forward Partnership To Protect Marine Life

The Ocean Conservancy and the City of Miami have announced a partnership to protect South Florida's oceans and coasts, including Biscayne Bay and the Miami River. 

Michal Kranz / WLRN

Federal and state officials are trying to strike a balance between conservation and public access to South Florida waters.

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission agreed Thursday to back tighter fishing limits in Biscayne National Park, where fish populations have dwindled.

Greg Lovett / PalmBeachPost.com

Engineers are designing for an increasingly soggy future in a rough industrial bay west of Riviera Beach, building Erector set-style defenses to keep out a wily intruder — water.

NOAA

Florida has an underappreciated secret weapon to help heal its ailing reefs: prickly sea urchins.

Steve Rothaus/Miami Herald

New sea level rise projections for South Florida show an alarming trend: higher waters are coming faster than previously expected.

According to the Southeast Florida Climate Compact, seas could rise between one foot and two-and-a-half feet by 2060 – two to five inches more than 2015 projections.

UNICEF

For years, Caribbean governments have argued their countries bear the brunt of climate change. A new U.N. study says Caribbean children may bear the worst of it.

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