DACA

Updated at 3:44 p.m. ET

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday handed the Trump administration a setback over the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, which shields hundreds of thousands of young immigrants from deportation.

The court declined to take up a key case dealing with the Obama-era DACA — for now.

The high court said an appeals court should hear the case first. The result is DACA will stay in place until or if the Supreme Court takes it up.

Updated at 4:25 p.m. ET

The Senate failed to pass any immigration legislation before a self-imposed Friday deadline, leaving lawmakers with no plan to address the roughly 700,000 immigrants who stand to lose legal protections as early as March 5.

The defeat follows a rocky 24 hours of negotiations on a bipartisan bill that failed following a veto threat from President Trump. By a 39-60 vote, senators rejected a White House-backed plan that became a partisan lightning rod after Trump insisted his plan was the only one he would sign.

Updated at 6 p.m. ET

The Senate voted to begin debate on immigration Monday, launching an unusual process that could lead to a bipartisan immigration fix — or leave Congress with no solution for the hundreds of thousands of immigrants who stand to lose legal protections by March 5.

Christian Olvera's parents know how to drive. But they're afraid to, because they're in the country illegally, and they don't have driver's licenses.

So most days, Olvera drives them to work.

Olvera is 26 years old, and looks even younger, with curly black hair and a baby face. But he's taken on a lot of responsibility. On paper, Olvera owns the family business. Even the house where they live, on a leafy street in Dalton, Georgia, is in his name.

"People ask me, do you still live with your parents?," Olvera joked. "I'll say no, my parents live with me."

Two-thirds of Americans say people brought to the United States as children and now residing in the country illegally should be granted legal status — and a majority are against building a wall along the border with Mexico, according to a new NPR/Ipsos poll.

Miami Herald

Sundial guests for Wednesday, January 31st, 2018

Jessica Bakeman/WLRN Education Reporter gives us an update on the legislative session.

Author/Journalist Laura Wides-Munoz discusses her book "The Making of a Dream."

Felicia Hatcher/ Co-founder of Black Tech Week joins us to talk tech in South Florida.

Caitie Switalski / WLRN

  South Florida Congresswoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz is one of a few lawmakers who are bringing Dreamers as their special guests to Tuesday’s State of the Union Address. 

 

In the U.S. there are 1.8 million Dreamers, otherwise known as recipients of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) immigration status. It was last year that President Donald Trump made known he would not be renewing the program, which would affect an estimated 800,000 of these Dreamers. 

Of the 690,000 undocumented immigrants now facing an uncertain future as Congress and President Trump wrangle over the DACA program are about 8,800 school teachers.

The real possibility that they'll be deported if the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program is allowed to expire has put enormous stress on them.

Updated at 5:06 p.m. ET

The federal government is back open for business on Tuesday, but the immigration fight that brought it to a three-day shutdown is far from over.

Odalis Garcia / WLRN

More than 2,000 people -mostly women but not exclusively so- gathered on Sunday at Miami's Wynwood to mark the first anniversary of the Women's March and reiterate their commitment to "resist" President Donald Trump's administration and create a more feminist world.

Many people showed up with family, friends, and their pets. It was very much a communal affair. There were also food trucks and tents highlighting issues from reproductive rights and mass incarceration, to climate change. 

Odalis Garcia / WLRN

DREAMERS and activists with the Florida Immigrant Coalition gathered outside Senator Bill Nelson’s office in Coral Gables on Thursday demanding him to vote no on a spending bill that doesn't  include a clean DREAM act.

“A clean DREAM act would basically give a pathway to citizenship to undocumented youth. And it would not include more enforcement or a wall [or] more criminalization for our communities,” said Paola Muñoz, a community organizer for the Florida Immigrant Coalition.

José A. Iglesias / Miami Herald

A national teachers union is targeting two South Florida Republicans in an ad campaign pressuring members of Congress to force a vote on a replacement for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals.

President Donald Trump has announced he’s ending the Obama-era immigration program that allows immigrants who were brought to the U.S. illegally as children to obtain work permits and reside here without fear of deportation. Trump has challenged Congress to come up with a different solution for about 800,000 so-called Dreamers.

By now, you've likely heard about President Trump's reported remark last week that the U.S. should bring in more people from Norway instead of from "shithole countries" like El Salvador, Haiti and African nations.

The reaction was swift and loud. Citizens (and allies) of those countries filled social media pages with photos of idyllic beaches, city skylines and shiny structures in so-called "shithole countries."

They also shared impressive lists of personal achievements that ended with: "I'm from a #shithole country."

President Trump and congressional Democrats appear no closer to a deal on protecting "Dreamers" from deportation, but GOP lawmakers are working on a Plan B that would — if approved — prevent an election-year shutdown of the government, extending funding at least another month.

A continuing resolution is due to expire this Friday, but Republicans have proposed kicking the can down the road once more with an extension on stop-gap funding through Feb. 16.

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