everglades

Robert F. Bukaty / AP

South Floridians could face water restrictions in 2020 because of a dry rainy season and low water levels in Lake Okeechobee, farmers and Everglades conservationists warned Tuesday.

If the water level drops even a few feet over the driest months, they expect a drought in the spring. During droughts, consumers must water lawns on alternate days, limit car washing and conserve water use in general.

Madeline Fox / WLRN

In the background of their morning television program, observant CBS and NBC viewers might have glimpsed a wooden replica 1920s steamboat. 

Florida Governor Ron DeSantis released his wish list for the 2020-2021 budget. It totals 91.4 billion, with much of that $400 million increase going to education. 

Jenny Staletovich/WLRN

A stand-off between Florida’s Indian tribes and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is threatening to derail work to restore more than a half million acres of swamps and marshes.

Charles Trainor JR. /Miami Herald

South Florida builders are pushing to strip protection from farmland near the Everglades - and the controversial extension of the Dolphin Expressway - to open it up to future expansion.

The land sits outside the urban development boundary,  the line drawn to protect farm fields and wetlands - and is part of an area designated for future growth.

Officials say Florida trappers have captured a record-setting python as part of a growing effort that encourages hunters to remove the invasive snakes from the Everglades.

Miami Herald Archive

A lease on sugar farms at the center of dispute that pitted Gov. Ron DeSantis against South Florida water managers was cancelled Thursday.

DeSantis announced Florida Crystals terminated the lease on land slated for a 17,000-acre reservoir - a critical piece of Everglades restoration needed to provide water to southern marshes. The sugar farmers voluntarily cancelled the lease on Monday, he said.

Leo Correa / AP

COMMENTARY

Here’s a dirty little secret about Amazon deforestation that liberals prefer you overlook: the slash-and-burn may be ugly under right-wing Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro, but it was bad when leftists controlled the rainforest, too. Under former President Dilma Rousseff, the liberal darling who ruled Brazil from 2011 until her impeachment in 2016, Amazon deforestation actually increased.

In no way does that excuse Bolsonaro’s reckless efforts to accelerate the trend – which in 2019 have resulted in an alarming 85 percent rise in Amazon fires that have destroyed more than 7,000 square miles of rainforest. What it points out is that Brazil, left or right, is and largely has been a lousy steward of an emerald ecosystem known as the lungs of the earth.

PEDRO PORTAL / MIAMI HERALD

Water managers are doubling down efforts to identify pollution hot spots in the northern Everglades with a plan that would increase water testing by more than 40 percent.

The proposal, which is scheduled for discussion Thursday by South Florida Water Management District governing board members, escalates monitoring in watersheds that flow into areas ripe for toxic blue-green algae outbreaks.

Miami Herald archives

There's a new wrinkle in the ongoing debate over whether to build a highway across protected wetlands in Miami-Dade County: an iffy savings on commute times.

The Florida Everglades can be a contentious place. Politicians, conservationists and farmers never seem to agree on much.

Debate among scientists tends to be collegial. But a new study on coral and the Florida Keys that gained national headlines last week has reignited a decades-old dispute over pollution and the Everglades.

 

Frank Ridgley / Zoo Miami

Invasive snake populations in the Everglades continue to have devastating impacts on the ecosystem. 

Burmese Pythons, North African Pythons and Boa Constrictors have reduced the population of fur bearing animals by 99 percent, according to scientists. Since 2007, Zoo Miami has been working with the National Park Service, the United States Geological Services and the University of Florida to manage and eradicate invasive species from the Everglades.

Miami Herald archives

Extending the 836/Dolphin Expressway over protected wetlands in Miami-Dade County is drawing new scrutiny from South Florida water managers.

Kirsten Hines

The new executive director of the environmental group Friends of the Everglades is not that impressed with Gov. Ron DeSantis' environmental record thus far. 

Earlier this year, the governor granted $625 million to Everglades restoration and water quality projects as part of a proposed $91.3 billion state budget plan. But according to Alex Gillen, the new director, that's not enough.

"I don't think you should be rewarded for doing kind of what you're supposed to do," he said on Sundial. 

Gillen spoke on the show about environmental concerns across the state. 

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