federal courts

The two men responsible for stealing a gold bar from a Key West treasure museum were sentenced Monday at the federal courthouse in Key West.

Richard Johnson received five years and three months in federal prison, while Jarred Goldman was ordered to serve three years and four months.

Mel Fisher Maritime Museum

The Key West case of the stolen gold bar has ended with two convictions but with only a sliver of the treasure recovered.

Jarred Goldman acted as the lookout while his cohort stole a 16th century gold bar from its case at a Key West museum in 2010, a federal jury decided Wednesday evening.

He is due in court for sentencing July 23 when he faces up to 15 years in prison for the heist that stunned the Southernmost City and robbed a museum of a treasure valued at $550,000.

Mel Fisher Maritime Museum

Eight years after it was stolen from a Key West treasure museum — and almost 400 years after it sank to the bottom of the ocean — a gold bar is at the center of a federal trial that began Tuesday in Key West.

Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts released his annual report on the federal judiciary on Sunday.

In one section of the 16-page report, he promised a careful evaluation of the judiciary's sexual misconduct policies.

He said recent events have "illuminated the depth of the problem of sexual harassment in the workplace."

Roberts added, "Events in the past few weeks have made clear that the judicial branch is not immune."

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A federal jury deliberated for just over an hour Tuesday before convicting a 25-year-old Key West man on two terror-related charges.

Harlem Suarez, 25, was found guilty of attempting to use a weapon of mass destruction and attempting to provide material support to a foreign terrorist organization.

The case started in April 2015 when the FBI received a report about a Facebook user who was attempting to recruit people to join ISIS, the terrorist group. That Facebook user was Suarez, then 23 and living with his parents in their apartment on Stock Island.