The Florida Roundup

WLRN News / Miami Herald

If you thought the first year of President Trump’s Administration was an unprecedented year in politics, just wait. 

2018 brings with it the midterm election, including the races for Florida governor, the U.S. Senate and House and the expiration of two federal immigration programs — Temporary Protected Status and Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals.

Plus, a passenger train service is supposed to get rolling between Miami, Fort Lauderdale and West Palm Beach. 

Miami Herald

About 4,700 people died in Puerto Rico in September and October of 2016. A year later, 5,800 people died over that same two-month stretch. Could the difference of 1,100 deaths been caused by Hurricane Maria?

According to the island’s official count, the storm killed 62 people. The Center for Investigative Journalism looked at government data on deaths, trying to get a handle on Maria’s death toll on the island.

A Florida senator quits after news of more bad behavior and big changes could be coming to the shipping industry after the disaster surrounding El Faro. Plus, we have a look at the far-ranging influence of Florida icon Jimmy Buffett.


REUTERS

Two of Florida’s largest counties, Palm Beach and Broward, have started a process that could take opioid drug makers to court for their roles in the opioid crisis. 

Miami Herald

Sexual harassment, abuse and inappropriate behavior are not new, and South Florida itself is not immune. "Abuse isn't an economic issue; it's across the board. In Hispanic culture it is a double whammy: It's a culture of machismo and a culture of silence. It's a deadly combination," says Miami Herald columnist Fabiola Santiago.

M. SPENCER GREEN / AP

There are nearly two million gun licenses in Florida but figuring out exactly how many guns are in the state is a more challenging figure to extract. Florida, like most states, does not require gun owners to register their weapons. 

AP Photo/Steve Cannon

The first reports of Sen. Jeff Clemens' extramarital affair with a lobbyist came four days before Halloween. The Lake Worth politician was the top Democrat in the state Senate and set to lead the minority party in 2019. He resigned that same day.

Facebook via Miami Herald

It was a Nixonesque moment — a politician asked about questionable campaign tactics — when Michael Grieco told the Miami Herald to “look right into my soul.”

 

Greico, a first-time commissioner elected in 2013, handed in his resignation at City Hall on Oct. 24. He faced a charge of accepting an illegal campaign contribution, but he avoided admitting guilt and said he didn’t do it.

 

Courtesy

This week on The Florida Roundup we're looking at tax dollars going to private schools along with Gov. Rick Scott's desire to spend more on the environment. We also have a look at the new film, "The Florida Project," that shines a light on life along the state's economic fringe.

You can listen to the full show here

Private Schools

Will Jacksonville, Miami or any Florida city win the battle for Amazon.com's second headquarters? We discuss the possibility in this week's The Florida Roundup Statewide Edition. 

MARK HEDDEN / MARKHEDDEN.COM

The Florida Roundup tackles a big backlog in immigration court, the housing squeeze in the Keys after Irma and how the storm may have helped sea life but hurt those making a living from the sea. 

This week's guests on The Florida Roundup with host Tom Hudson: 

Recovery After Irma On The Florida Roundup

Sep 24, 2017
CAITLIN OSTROFF / MIAMI HERALD

The Florida Roundup concentrated this week on the recovery efforts after Hurricane Irma. Guests included: 

Part-Time Professors Push To Unionize At Broward, MDC

Sep 4, 2017
Credit John O'Connor / StateImpact Florida

Education has traditionally been a mainstay topic for labor activists. So it seems appropriate that going into Labor Day this year, some South Florida educators are trying to unionize.

In recent years, colleges and universities, hoping to cut costs, have increasingly relied on part-time professors. In response, a growing number of part-time professors are pushing for unions. They're seeking things like higher wages and health-care benefits.

WIN MCNAMEE / GETTY IMAGES

After Harvey, the questions all South Floridians are asking are — could it happen here? What if it happened here?

Listen: 

With Hurricane Irma gathering strength in the Atlantic, we'll talk about the science of Harvey, the hydrology of South Florida and how flood water collects and moves about our region. WLRN's Tom Hudson will talk with two county emergency management directors about getting ready and staying ready. 

AL DIAZ /Miami Herald

This week’s guests on The Florida Roundup with host Luis Hernandez:

  • Jacqueline Charles, Miami Herald
  • John Morales, Chief Meteorologist at NBC 6 Miami
  • Eliot Kleinberg, Palm Beach Post
  • Rene Rodriguez, Miami Herald
  • Lulu Ramadan, Palm Beach Post
  • Joey Flechas, Miami Herald

Tens of thousands of Haitians are living in the United States under Temporary Protected Status (TPS). The status was provided after the 2010 earthquake in Haiti that killed more than 300,000 people.

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