food stamps

Matias Ocner / Miami Herald

For those impacted by Hurricane Irma who missed out on getting emergency food stamps earlier this month from the Florida Department of Children and Families, there will be a second chance.

On Monday, DCF announced Disaster Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (DSNAP) benefits will be distributed during a three-day span at a Miami-Dade and Broward site.

WLRN

Today in Sundial: Tens of thousands of South Florida residents are still in need of food assistance more than a month after Hurricane Irma smashed through the region. Recently, people waited in lines for hours to qualify for D-Snap, a federal program being facilitated by the Florida Department of Children and Families.

State officials say they have distributed more than $1 billion worth of food assistance following Hurricane Irma.

Peter Haden / WLRN

As Floridians continue lining up for food assistance due to hardships caused by Hurricane Irma, state officials announced they intend to re-open enrollment in two South Florida counties to meet demand.

Matias J. Ocner / Miami Herald

Roberto Koltun / Miami Herald

Over the weekend, several food assistance centers in Miami-Dade and Broward were abruptly shut down by local and state officials because of “health and safety concerns,” turning away thousands who lined up for the benefits.

Authorities said the crowd was just too overwhelming, leaving gridlocked streets at a standstill. Medics and police had to respond to many cases of heat exhaustion, as well as fights among “frustrated participants” applying for D-SNAP, the Department of Children and Families’ Disaster Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

Kendrix Haynes lost a lot in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma: all his food and his pet bearded dragon, Rocky. It was the power (or rather the lack of it). Without it, his refrigerator couldn’t stay cold enough and the heat lamp wasn't hot enough. 

Updated at 3:02 p.m. ET.

The Trump administration says it can balance the federal budget within a decade. Its proposal calls for significant cuts to social safety net programs and assumes more robust economic growth.

The administration released what it calls a "Taxpayer First" budget on Tuesday.

"This is, I think, the first time in a long time that an administration has written a budget through the eyes of the people who are actually paying the taxes," White House Budget Director Mick Mulvaney told reporters in a briefing on Monday.

Creative Commons

Most people in Florida who get food stamps are required to work in order to keep them.

A bill (HB 23) that’s slated to be heard by the full state House of Representatives would increase the penalties if people fail to meet those requirements. A now-competing bill in the state Senate would strike these penalties.

Groups that help low-income families get food assistance are alarmed by a recent drop in the number of immigrants seeking help. Some families are even canceling their food stamps and other government benefits, for fear that receiving them will affect their immigration status or lead to deportation. Many of the concerns appear to be unfounded but have been fueled by the Trump administration's tough stance on immigration.

Kyle Pegolo/flickr

A new poll is out that looks at the attitudes of Miamians on numerous issues. The poll was commissioned by WLRN, el Nuevo Herald, the Miami Herald, and Univision 23.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

For the past year, Lucy Perry and her longtime boyfriend William Royal have lived beneath a traffic sign on the sidewalk along Southwest Second Street under I-95. With about four dozen other homeless people, they wait for a church group to come by and hand out styrofoam containers of food.

 

Perry, Royal and many others out on the street are among the 350,000 people who lost their food stamps this year because of new state rules that adults without children who can work must work in order to get the monthly assistance.

 

Gregg Avedon / Flickr

The Miami metro area has a higher percentage of households relying on food stamps than nearly every other major metropolitan area in the country, according to new data from the U.S. Census.

In 2012 and 2013, 17.5 percent of households in the Miami metro received food stamps, or Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits. Only the Detroit metro area ranked higher with 18.5 percent.

www.facebook.com/FeedingSFL

11/25/14 - Today’s Topical Currents examines studies of South Florida’s “working poor.”  Having a job doesn’t preclude a lack of sustenance. Only 1% of those who get food assistance are unemployed.  Seniors often face a choice of paying utilities and rent . . . or going hungry. We’ll learn more about the efforts with guests: United Way of Miami-Dade Sr. Dir.

Local Food Distrubutor Gets Funding Increase

Jun 30, 2014
Creative Commons

A Homestead-based food-assistance program called Farm Share received a $1.5 million check last week. State Rep. Kionne McGhee delivered the money, which was allocated in this year’s state budget. This is a $500,000 increase from last year’s state contribution.

Farm Share uses inmate and volunteer labor to sort, package and deliver food to churches, soup kitchens or other organizations across the state that use and distribute food to those in need. It provides the food for free, unlike many other food distribution organizations.

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