Leslie Ovalle

Multimedia Producer

Leslie Ovalle produces the morning newscasts that air during Morning Edition. As a multimedia producer, she also works on visual and digital storytelling. Her interests include immigration, technology and the environment.

Before joining the team, she was a production assistant for NPR’s “All Things Considered” program, where she worked on the weekly “All Tech Considered” segments and produced daily stories.

Leslie also led the “Argentina Project” podcast at the Wilson Center, a non-partisan policy think tank in Washington D.C.

Her journalism career began when she was in college working at Florida International University’s student paper. From there she went on to freelance at the Miami Herald and intern at the South Florida Sun Sentinel and WLRN.

She was awarded a Sunshine State Award for Best News Photo in the student category for her work covering the aftermath of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas school shooting in 2018.

Leslie was raised in Miami and was born in Bogota, Colombia.

Ways to Connect

Cholakov-Gongalov Architects / Creative Commons

Would you leave your job because of a challenging supervisor?

A new survey by international staffing firm Robert Half International says 58 percent of workers in South Florida already have. That’s nine percentage points more than the rest of the nation.

J. Scott Applewhite / AP

One week ago, President Trump said in a tweet that four Democratic freshman Congresswomen "go back" and "help fix the totally broken and crime infested places from which they came." All of the representatives are U.S. citizens. Three were born here. 

Democrats widely criticized the tweets. Republicans mostly stayed silent. Trump denied the comments were racist.

Leslie Ovalle / WLRN

Extreme storms and sea level rise are leading real estate investors to look at communities with higher elevation, like Little Haiti, causing a wave of new development that threatens current residents in those areas.

Leslie Ovalle / WLRN News

South Florida is known for welcoming those fleeing economic and political strife in their homeland. Cubans, Venezuelans and Haitians arrive to an already established community with a shared language and culture.

 

But what about those refugees that come to South Florida from other parts of the world less represented in our area, like Syria?