Fort Lauderdale

Fort Lauderdale's Stonewall Museum Seeks Smithsonian Partnership

Jan 21, 2014
Robotclaw666 / Flickr CC

Fort Lauderdale's Stonewall National Museum and Archives is seeking a partnership with the Smithsonian Institution in Washington D.C.

The Stonewall, the nation's largest collection of LGBT literature and periodicals, has applied for membership to the Smithsonian Affiliations program. The program would allow both museums to exchange artifacts among 183 affiliates across 43 states, Panama and Puerto Rico.

More Mormons? Time For A Temple

Jan 20, 2014
Courtesy of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

The first Mormon temple in South Florida is scheduled to open this spring in Davie to serve the region’s growing Mormon population.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints’ membership in South Florida has almost doubled in the last six years, to around 25,000, according to church officials.

All those Mormons have had to go to Orlando or farther to hold important religious ceremonies, like marriage, performed in a temple.

Tony Burns is a local church representative. He says the new temple’s architecture features South Florida’s natural environment.

Florida Department of Transportation

If not for its patchwork of different shades of asphalt, you would never imagine the stretch of State Road A1A along Fort Lauderdale Beach was all underwater a year ago.

Last November, Tropical Storm Sandy and small storms that followed washed out a four-block section of A1A, north of Sunrise Boulevard. Sandy wasn’t a big storm, so the uncharacteristic destruction it brought has been explained by sea-level rise, which can cause increasingly harmful storm surges.

FortLauderdale.gov

In most big cities, altering a street sign is not much cause for fanfare.  But Fort Lauderdale’s decision to re-brand one particular street is being hailed by many in the city’s African-American community.

City commissioners decided Tuesday night that the name “Sistrunk Boulevard” will no longer stop near the railroad tracks, a segregation-era dividing line between the city’s black and white communities.  Sistrunk will now appear along with Northeast Sixth Street on signs running through Flagler Village, a section quickly gentrifying into a predominantly white neighborhood.

Eric Barton

In the 1980s, after the bolívar crashed and Venezuelans suddenly couldn’t fly to Miami every weekend, a gaita band recorded a sardonic song whose chorus lamented, "Qué triste domingo sin Miami Beach."

How sad Sunday is without Miami Beach.

Karelia Arauz/WLRN

If you're driving through the center of Miami tonight, you need to take a close look at the map below. 

The monthly group bike ride called Critical Mass is taking place again. Cyclists (many in costume for Halloween) will be riding 12.5 miles around Miami starting at Government Center and ending at Grand Central Park.

The Miami event usually draws a couple thousand cyclists and can back up traffic. The route also changes every month.

Cyclists joining in Fort Lauderdale's Critical Mass have a 14-mile route planned that will start at the War Memorial Auditorium.

African-American Research Library and Cultural Center

In every major city, there's at least one street sign that tells black folks they're in the right place, but tells white folks that they probably took a wrong turn.

For decades in Fort Lauderdale, one of those signs has read Sistrunk Boulevard.

The boulevard, which runs through the city’s historically black business district, is currently at the center of a contentious debate between two communities.

And the dispute is raising questions about what it takes for a neighborhood with a troubled past to rehabilitate its image.

Tropical Pedicab/Flickr

If you're driving through the center of Miami tonight, you need to take a close look at the map below.  

The monthly group bike ride called Critical Mass is taking place again. Cyclists will be riding 12.5 miles around Miami starting at Government Center and ending at Grand Central Park.

The Miami event usually draws a couple thousand cyclists and can back up traffic. The route also changes every month.

Cyclists joining in Fort Lauderdale's Critical Mass have a 14-mile route planned that will start at the War Memorial Auditorium.

Wikimedia Commons

If you’re hoping to enjoy a beer on the beach this Fourth of July, you’ll be able to do so in Fort Lauderdale and Hollywood for one day only.

Both cities have announced a one-day exception to their ordinances banning open containers of alcohol on the beach.

The reason for the ban is to keep beach-goers from disrespecting and disrupting the enjoyment of others while visiting the shore, said Fort Lauderdale mayor Jack Seiler. The city lifts the ban for special events.

Florida State Archives

This weekend, a devoted national and international crowd of devoted tiki-philes descends on Fort Lauderdale for The Hukilau. The annual gathering celebrates the music, history, and, of course, cocktails, associated with American midcentury tiki culture.

flaglergarden.org

Like many young professionals, 30-year-old Chad Scott had second thoughts about his job.

He was a CPA with accounting giant Ernest & Young for more than six years before becoming an internal auditor with Miami-based Burger King International. But something was missing.

"I wanted a life I could live without anxiety," said the Pembroke Pines native, recalling all the times he was chained to a desk during tax season and wouldn't see the sun for days.

Victor Martinez/Flickr

If the city of Santa Clara has its way, the International Swimming Hall of Fame in Fort Lauderdale may move to California.

That's right, Santa Clara, the city that just built a new stadium for the San Francisco 49ers and is neck-n-neck with South Florida in a bid for Super Bowl L.

Santa Clara says it plans to raise $2 million for an endowment to support the swimming hall as well as $10 million to move it to the West Coast.

The hall has also received inquiries from England and China.

Yes, Art Abounds North Of Wynwood

May 13, 2013
Photo courtesy FAT Village Facebook page

Last week's satirical Fort Lauderdale slam by The Onion claimed the city “lacks any kind of cultural depth," something hotly disputed by locals.

So, where are the cultural gems in Broward and Palm Beach counties? Don’t get fooled by the wealth of strip malls, high-rises, and balmy palm tree landscape.

Eric Barton

Chances are you have a friend who forces you to make excuses for him. He’s just not good in big crowds. Or he’s like that because of the tough boss he has at work. He’s late all the time, but then, he’s just from Miami.

Living in Fort Lauderdale is like having one of those friends. It’s a city that’s often the punch line of a joke in a state that just can’t seem to stay out of late-night monologues.

Free Divers Add Depth To Their Lives

Mar 18, 2013

South Florida is becoming a freediving hub, thanks in part to renowned Czech diver Martin Stepanek, who founded Freediving Instructors International in Fort Lauderdale. His partner Niki Roderick– also an accomplished free diver– teaches courses too.

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