Holocaust education

Allen Eyestone / The Palm Beach Post

Former Spanish River High Principal William Latson is trying to get his job back.

A Palm Beach County public schools investigator criticized his supervisors’ handling of a high school principal’s explosive Holocaust remarks, calling the district’s decision to fire the principal “problematic.”

Alina Dabrowska was 20 years old when she first heard about Auschwitz. She was an inmate at a prison in Nazi-occupied Poland — incarcerated for helping Allied forces — and one day in 1943, while walking the grounds, a new arrival warned her about it.

"She said, 'You're all going to Auschwitz! Do you know what kind of camp that is?' " Dabrowska recalls. "She told us that if someone is out of strength, they were immediately killed. She told us many horrible things. None of us believed her."

Gay Block

This story was updated on Nov. 8, 2019 to correct some factual errors.

 

Heroes can have different faces. They can be teachers, diplomats, families that live routine lives until extreme circumstances force them to make significant choices. 

 

This is the main takeaway from "Rescuers," an exhibition that just opened at the JCC Levis Sandler Center in Boca Raton. It explores the stories of individuals who rescued Jews during the Holocaust.

 

Holocaust Survivors
Caitie Switalski / WLRN

Julius Eisenstein looks great for having just turned 100 years old. 

He walked into his second birthday party on Thursday morning waving to a clapping crowd at Goodman Jewish Family Services of Broward County. 

 

Eisenstein, who lives in Hallandale Beach,  is one of Broward County's most outspoken Holocaust survivors.