immigrants

Mitchell Santos Toledo came to the United States when he was 2. His parents had temporary visas when they brought him and his 5-year-old sister to the country. They never left. This spring, Santos Toledo will graduate from Harvard Law School. He is one of the 700,000 DREAMers whose fate in the U.S. may well be determined by a Supreme Court case to be argued Tuesday.

Updated Oct. 24 at 9:39 a.m. ET

The Census Bureau is asking states to voluntarily share driver's license records as part of the Trump administration's efforts to produce detailed data about the U.S. citizenship status of every person living in the country.

Fernando Vergara / AP

COMMENTARY

On Local 10’s “This Week in South Florida” last Sunday – a day after the anti-immigrant/anti-Hispanic massacre in El Paso, Texas – I used the term “white Christianist terrorism” to describe the wave of white supremacist violence plaguing the U.S.

The Trump administration continues to separate hundreds of migrant children from their parents despite a federal court ruling that ordered an end to the practice, according to court documents filed in California by the American Civil Liberties Union.

With the legal fight to block a citizenship question from the 2020 census behind them, immigrant rights groups and other advocates are now turning toward what they consider an even greater challenge — getting every person living in the U.S. counted.

Lily Oppenheimer / WLRN

Like many Venezuelan expats living in South Florida, Kendall resident Paola Berriros still has family and friends suffering under the authoritarian regime of president Nicolás Maduro. She fled Venezuela when the country's humanitarian crisis was brewing 15 years ago. 

Now Berriros' 6-year-old daughter, Karina, has learned to play piano, violin and sing under Musicall - a South Florida non-profit that gives children from all backgrounds access to music education. 

During the 2016 presidential campaign, Fatima Farheen Mirza's family received an unexpected gift.

At least, that's how it seemed when a neighbor's daughter delivered a bag of candy to their front door. Mirza's parents had recently moved to Texas. At first, Mirza's mother thought the candy might be a sort of welcome to the neighborhood.

"Then Mumma looked closer," Mirza writes.

It wasn't a gift bag, but a Ziploc plastic bag — "unadorned and filled only with Skittles."

When migrant children cross the border without their parents, they're sent to federal shelters until caseworkers can find them a good home. But everything changes when they turn 18. That's when, in many cases, they're handcuffed and locked up in an adult detention facility. The practice is sparking lawsuits and outrage from immigrant advocates.

A Texas nonprofit that works with families separated at the border has turned down a $250,000 contribution from Salesforce, a company under pressure for its work creating software for the U.S. Customs and Border Patrol.

One patient's death changed the course of Dr. Lilia Cervantes' career. The patient, Cervantes says, was a woman from Mexico with kidney failure who repeatedly visited the emergency room for more than three years. In that time, her heart had stopped more than once, and her ribs were fractured from CPR. The woman finally decided to stop treatment because the stress was too much for her and her two young children. Cervantes says she died soon after.

Miami Herald reporter Doug Hanks has been following closely the race to represent District 5 at the Miami-Dade County Commission. This is the first time in 20 years the seat has opened. Hanks talked to Sundial about the candidates, their platforms and the significance of this race.

List of voting place for District 5 on May 22 can be found here.

Hurricane season begins June 1 and director of the National Hurricane Center Ken Graham, who recently spoke at the 32nd Annual Governor’s Hurricane Conference, joins Sundial.

The conference is held before the start of each hurricane season and offers sessions on hurricane preparedness and communication. Sundial spoke to Graham about the conference and the need for awareness around how climate change intensifies storms.

Andrew Harnik / AP via Miami Herald

COMMENTARY

Ever since he ran away from immigration reform, Americans no longer look to Florida Sen. Marco Rubio for bridge-building leadership on that issue. But I’m still willing to believe Rubio’s heart is in the right place, even if his head left the building.

So I was also willing to believe the Miami Republican was sincere when he told reporters in Tallahassee this week that he doesn’t “see the problem” with the Trump administration’s proposal to ask folks if they’re U.S. citizens in the 2020 Census.

Miami Herald

Sundial guests for Wednesday, January 31st, 2018

Jessica Bakeman/WLRN Education Reporter gives us an update on the legislative session.

Author/Journalist Laura Wides-Munoz discusses her book "The Making of a Dream."

Felicia Hatcher/ Co-founder of Black Tech Week joins us to talk tech in South Florida.

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