inauguration

Teresa Frontado / WLRN

Women in South Florida united Saturday in a show of solidarity with the marchers in Washington D.C., around the country, and around the world.

Within an hour of opening its gates, the Bayfront Park amphitheater lawns and seats were filled with more than 10,000 demonstrators.

 

A video posted by WLRN Public Media (@wlrn) on

Jan 21, 2017 at 1:15pm PST

Updated at 9:00 a.m. ET

The Trump Administration spent its first full day in office taking shots at the media and arguing about crowd sizes at Friday's inauguration.

Press secretary Sean Spicer delivered a fiery broadside against the Fourth Estate from the White House Briefing Room Saturday evening, claiming that reporters had engaged in "deliberately false reporting" in the past 24 hours since President Trump took the oath of office. And, after berating the press, he walked away without taking any questions.

Updated at 4 p.m. ET

The National Mall has flooded with pink, as demonstrators descend on the nation's capital Saturday for the Women's March on Washington. Just one day after President Trump's inauguration, marchers from across the country have gathered in the city to protest his agenda and support for women's rights.

The event opened with a rally, to be followed by the march proper — which had a path laid out from a starting position near the U.S. Capitol to its endpoint near the Washington Monument.

People traveled to Washington, D.C., from around the country to witness the transition of power to the 45th president of the United States. Amid celebration and clashes, a few faces stood out. Watching giant screens, blocks away from the incoming president, these people braved crowds and weather to watch history being made.


Ken Crider and his wife, Penny

Age: 51

City of Residence: Detroit area

Donald Trump had already emerged as the likely presidential nominee of the Republican Party back in April when he gave a foreign policy speech pledging that "America First" would be "the major and overriding theme of my administration."

The NPR Politics team is annotating and fact checking in real time Donald J. Trump's inaugural address to the nation from the West lawn of the U.S. Capitol. This is his first official speech as president of the United States of America. 

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LIVE Blog Of Donald Trump's Inauguration

Jan 20, 2017
Associated Press

The NPR team will be publishing stories, including live video both from the Capitol and along the parade route, all day on Inauguration day.

How well do you know U.S. history? We dare you to try our test and figure out how much you really know about the traditions and customs around the official swearing-in of the president of the United States.

Associated Press

How well do you know Washington D.C.?

We take you on an interactive tour of the route that newly inaugurated president Donald J. Trump will follow from the Capitol building to the White House after his swearing in ceremony. 

Thanks to two organizers from Broward, Laura Sawyer-Broder and Stephanie Myers, South Florida will have its own Women’s Rally to coincide with the Women’s March happening in Washington D.C. the day after Donald Trump’s inauguration.

Twenty years ago, Sawyer-Broder successfully lobbied for improving airplane inspections, after her grandparents perished in the ValuJet Flight 592 that crashed in the Everglades. They were on their way to see her graduate from Emory University in Atlanta.

The peaceful transition of American power will be witnessed by the world once again Friday. Donald Trump will be sworn in as the 45th president of the United States. That has brought jubilation in conservative America. For them, Trump's win is a sigh of relief, a repudiation of Barack Obama's America and a pause on the liberalization of the world's remaining superpower.

This weekend, hundreds of thousands of Americans will be taking to the streets — some to celebrate, some to protest the inauguration and others to demonstrate for issues that the president-elect cares about.

If you happen to be one of those people, you might have this nagging question in the back of your mind: Will any of it make a difference?

While supporters of Donald Trump prepare for Friday's inauguration, so, too, are thousands of protesters.

Several dozen attended a training session this past weekend, run by a group called DisruptJ20. The group opposes just about everything the incoming administration stands for. Its goal is to disrupt, if not stop, Trump's inauguration.

For all their differences, when Donald Trump takes the oath of office to succeed Barack Obama on Friday, one small but symbolic similarity will be on display. Trump will place his hand on the Bible that President Lincoln used at his first inauguration, the same one President Obama used at both of his swearing in ceremonies.

The Lincoln Bible was purchased for the 1861 inauguration by Supreme Court Clerk William Thomas Carroll.

The six faith leaders President-elect Donald Trump has invited to pray at his inauguration come from diverse backgrounds, but they have something in common: All have personal ties to Trump or his family or have in some way signaled their approval of him, his politics or his wealth.

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