Parkland school shooting

C.M. GUERRERO / Miami Herald

When Martin Duque was in middle school and saw a classmate struggling to fit in, the “always smiling” teenager tried to make him feel welcomed.

“He quickly became one of my greatest friends — no question,” a teary-eyed Jose Hoyos told the Miami Herald on Sunday. Hoyos had moved to Parkland from Mexico nearly three years ago and attended Westglades Middle School with Duque, also a native Mexican.

The progression has become numbingly repetitive — mass bloodshed unleashed by a gunman, followed by the stories of the fallen, the funerals, the mourning, the talking heads and the calls for change that dwindle into nothingness.

Survivors of a mass shooting at a Florida high school are hoping to expand the reach of their gun control movement by seeking a boycott of companies doing business with the NRA and urging tourists to boycott the Sunshine State.

"You are not grieving alone. We are all grieving with you. The entire country is grieving with you," is the message that a group of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High graduates from around the country sent to the survivors of the school shooting via a video shared on social media. 

Courtesy

More than 500 people, classmates and community members filed into Church by the Glades in Coral Springs on Friday to pay their final respects to Helena Ramsay, a young scholar who loved to rescue cats.

Ramsay was one of 17 victims killed at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High. She had just turned 17 years old in January. 

She was described as a voracious reader and she loved crafting.

At her celebration service at Church by the Glades, her big brother Ellis Ramsay eulogized her.

Robert Runcie
Charles Trainor Jr. / Miami Herald

The superintendent of Broward County schools said a campus cop's decision not to enter the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School building where a shooter killed 17 on Feb. 14 was "inexcusable" and "despicable."

Referring to school resource officer Scot Peterson, Robert Runcie told reporters gathered outside the school on Friday morning: "I wish he had the same kind of courage that our teachers that have showed up here today have."

Miami Herald Archive

Florida’s governor and state lawmakers each released plans for improving school safety following last week’s shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, including major changes to gun laws and more money for mental health.

Adrianne Gonzalez / WLRN News

Student survivors of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland organized a protest for gun reform outside the Biergarten Restaurant in Boca Raton Thursday morning. It was one of several demonstrations around the country targeting politicians who have accepted donations from the NRA.

In the wake of the shootings at Marjorie Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, accusations are going around at a fast clip. 

Peter Haden / WLRN

Hundreds of people filled Church of the Glades in Coral Springs Thursday to honor slain Stoneman Douglas High School assistant football coach Aaron Feis.

Feis, 37, was killed in the Feb. 14 mass shooting at the school. Witnesses say he was shot as he ran at the shooter and pushed students out of harm’s way.

Ever the coach, Feis’s memorial service opened with the singing of the national anthem.

Matias Ocner / Miami Herald

Not even two weeks after a shooter fired more than 100 bullets in the hallways of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, students and staff are returning to the campus fearful of emotional triggers that could force them to relive the traumatic event.

"Valentine's Day was a day of love, passion and friendships as Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School celebrated February 14, 2018 ..."

That's how the student journalists writing for the Eagle Eye, the newspaper at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, started their story about one of the deadliest mass shootings in modern history.

That first line flowed quickly for senior Christy Ma, but the rest of the article took days to write as she relived the events.

South Florida Sun Sentinel

Broward Sheriff Scott Israel said Thursday the school resource officer stationed at Marjory Stoneman Douglas was suspended without pay after he learned the deputy never went into the building when the shooting began.

Scot Peterson chose to resign and retire Thursday morning Israel said.

Two students who survived the Florida school shooting and spoke publicly about it are not "crisis actors," despite the claims of several conspiracy-oriented sites and an aide to a Florida lawmaker.

Updated at 3:40 p.m. ET

Just over a week after 17 people were killed at Parkland, Fla., high school, National Rifle Association executive vice president and CEO Wayne LaPierre gave a fiery, defiant speech at the annual Conservative Political Action Conference, or CPAC, on Thursday at the National Harbor in Maryland. LaPierre defended Second Amendment rights and warned of a "socialist agenda" intended to strip firearms away from law-abiding citizens.

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