Temporary Protected Status

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The House Foreign Affairs Committee in Washington held a hearing Tuesday on the worsening crisis in Haiti. Haitian expats, some from Miami, expressed frustrations with Trump Administration policy towards Haiti.

The Trump administration is extending protections from deportation to more than 200,000 Salvadoran citizens living and working in the United States in an announcement made Monday.

Under the program called Temporary Protected Status — usually reserved to help foreign nationals from countries embroiled in wars or facing natural disasters — thousands of Salvadorans were allowed to stay in the U.S. following earthquakes in 2001.

Lily Oppenheimer / WLRN

Thousands of Venezuelans seeking political asylum continue to live in South Florida as a bill that would grant them Temporary Protected Status, or TPS, stalls in Congress. The U.S. House attempted to fast-track the bill to pass last month, but those efforts ultimately failed before the Senate left for a six-week break. 

JOSÉ A. IGLESIAS / MIAMI HERALD

The House of Representatives passed a bill to grant Temporary Protected Status, or TPS, for Venezuelans, the most significant legislative action to date in response to Venezuela’s humanitarian crisis.

The TPS bill, sponsored by Florida Reps. Mario Diaz-Balart, R-Miami, and Darren Soto, D-Kissimmee, heads to the U.S. Senate for consideration a day before the House leaves Washington for a six week recess.

The bill passed by a vote of 272-158, with 39 Republicans and one independent joining 232 Democrats in favor.

TPS For Venezuelans Blocked By House Republicans

Jul 24, 2019
PEDRO PORTAL / MIAMI HERALD

Republicans voted down a bill Tuesday that would provide Temporary Protected Status for Venezuelans, a setback for South Florida lawmakers from both parties.

Democrats needed GOP support for a bill sponsored by Reps. Darren Soto, D-Kissimmee, and Mario Diaz-Balart, R-Miami, after they fast-tracked the measure to force a vote before the House of Representatives leaves for its summer recess at the end of the week. The fast-tracking meant the bill needed two-thirds support instead of a simple majority to pass.

Tim Padgett / WLRN.org

Last month President Trump said he was considering granting Venezuelans living in the U.S. Temporary Protected Status, or TPS. But it turns out it was best those Venezuelans didn’t get their hopes up.

AL DIAZ / Maimi Herald

Tens of thousands of Haitians with Temporary Protected Status (TPS) have been granted more time to stay in the Sunshine State, at least for now. TPS was extended this week for four groups in the U.S. – Salvadorans, Hondurans, Sudanese and Haitians. That will allow TPS holders from those countries to remain in the U.S. until Jan. 2, 2020.

Jose A. Iglesias / El Nuevo Herald

On Wednesday, Venezuelans in South Florida and in Venezuela plan mass marches to protest their authoritarian regime. One of Miami’s new congresswomen returned to town on Tuesday today to host a roundtable on the crisis and discuss solutions.

It's well known that President Trump wants a wall on the southern U.S. border. He insists it's urgent to curb illegal immigration. But more than any wall, new barriers to legal immigration are likely to have more bearing on people trying to enter the United States. The United States is rejecting more legal immigrants than ever before.

The first casualty in 2018 was the U.S. refugee resettlement program, says Larry Yungk, a former official at the U.N. refugee agency and now co-chair of the advisory committee of Church World Service's refugee program.

TIm Padgett / WLRN.org

Earlier this month, a federal judge blocked the Trump administration’s efforts to end Temporary Protected Status, or TPS, for 300,000 immigrants. A nationwide bus tour urging Congress to pass a more permanent solution made a stop  Wednesday in Little Haiti.

WLRN

Florida recipients of a program that protects hundreds of thousands of immigrants from deportation are in Washington, D.C., this week, calling on Congress to pass a law that will let them remain in the U.S. 

Beneficiaries of Temporary Protected Status (TPS) from Haiti, Nicaragua, El Salvador and Honduras will face deportation in the next two years after the Trump administration's recent decisions to end protections for immigrants from those countries. The program has provided immigrants with temporary lawful status and work authorization. 

Sam Turken / WLRN

South Florida beneficiaries of a program that has protected more than 300,000 immigrants are bracing for the division of their families when the protection expires.

And activists say their fears have been heightened after watching the federal government's separation of migrant families who have crossed the Mexico border illegally.

The Trump administration announced last year that it's ending Temporary Protected Status for Hondurans, Haitians, Nicaraguans and Salvadorans. The program has shielded them from deportation. 

Tim Padgett / WLRN.org

The Trump Administration announced Monday it will end Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for 200,000 Salvadorans living in the country. South Florida’s Salvadoran population is relatively small - but the TPS ruling will still be felt here.

Al Diaz / Miami Herald

The leader of Miami-Dade County public schools sharply criticized the Trump administration’s immigration policies Tuesday morning during a keynote that sounded like part stump speech, part sermon.

Superintendent Alberto Carvalho delivered an impassioned address opening a bipartisan summit on immigration reform at the University of Miami, relating his own “journey” as a Portuguese immigrant who was once in the U.S. illegally.

Some 86,000 Hondurans remain in limbo after the acting secretary of the Department of Homeland Security, Elaine Duke, couldn't decided whether to extend or cancel their permission to stay in the U.S. But the department has given about 5,300 Nicaraguans notice that they have just over a year before they have to leave.

The two groups are covered under Temporary Protected Status which allows them to live and work in the U.S. after a storm ripped through their home countries while they were already here.

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