gun violence

Updated at 7:20 p.m. ET

Police questioned Nasim Aghdam in her car just hours before she opened fire on YouTube headquarters on Tuesday, wounding three people and apparently killing herself, the Associated Press reported.

Town Hall For Our Lives Coral Springs
Caitie Switalski / WLRN

One of the initiatives to keep the gun violence prevention movement going took shape on Tuesday night when the first "Town Hall For Our Lives," hosted by U.S. Rep. Ted Deutch at the Coral Springs Center for the Arts, opened its microphones to the community. 

Updated at 3:40 a.m. ET on Wednesday

A woman with an apparent grudge against YouTube for what she claimed was censoring and de-monetizing her videos, opened fire at the video-sharing service's San Bruno, Calif., headquarters, wounding several people before fatally shooting herself, according to police.

Updated at 6 p.m. ET

Seddique Mateen, the father of the man behind the 2016 Pulse nightclub massacre, worked with the FBI as a confidential informant for more than a decade leading right up to the shooting, according to attorneys for the shooter's widow.

Government health agencies have spent more than two decades shying away from gun violence research, but some say the new spending bill, signed by President Trump on Friday, will change that.

That is because, in agency instructions that accompany the bill, there is a sentence noting that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has the authority to conduct research on the causes of gun violence.

gun safety meeting
Caitie Switalski / WLRN

South Florida Congresswoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz hosted a roundtable on Monday to discuss how to keep the momentum for gun control going long after this coming Saturday's "March For Our Lives," organized by Parkland students with support from their peers around the country. 

The panel was a follow-up to a gun safety roundtable that Wasserman Schultz held earlier this month.

 

 

Leslie Ovalle / WLRN News

Demanding change and promising their generation would make it happen, students walked out of schools across South Florida and the country on Wednesday — one month after 17 students and teachers died in a shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland.

Updated at 2:39 p.m. ET

Since the Columbine school shooting nearly 20 years ago, the conversation after mass shootings has inevitably included media that depict violence — and the effect on children.

Hector Gabino / El Nuevo Herald

Guests on Sundial for Tuesday, March 6:

Gubernatorial candidates from across the state are preparing for the primary elections that are taking place in August. Miami Beach's former mayor, Philip Levine, has tossed his hat in the ring to run to be Florida's next governor.  He spoke about his plans leading up to the primary elections and what he hopes to accomplish should he become Florida's next governor.

After Parkland, there have been many calls to make schools a "harder target" — for example, by arming teachers. But there's a decent amount of research out there on what actually makes schools safer, and most of it doesn't point to more guns.

The Florida House

The white Republican leaders of the Florida Legislature believe giving guns to school staff members will help protect students.

But black members in both houses warn it could endanger them — particularly children of color, who are often disciplined more harshly than their white peers in school.

Patrick Farrell / WLRN

Mount Calvary Missionary Baptist Church is sandwiched between a police station and a housing project in Miami’s Liberty City neighborhood. Dozens of families over the years have filed into the church’s sanctuary to say tear-filled goodbyes to children and teens killed by gun violence.

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