Zika

Zika Cases Continue To Increase In Florida

Sep 4, 2018
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Florida has had 66 reported cases of the mosquito-borne Zika virus this year, with the number increasing slightly during the past three weeks, according to information posted on the state Department of Health website.

The 66 cases reported as of Tuesday all are considered “travel” related --- generally meaning people were infected with the virus elsewhere and brought it into the state. The total was up from 62 on Aug. 13.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

A deadly chemical that targets baby mosquitoes is much more effective when attacking Zika virus than traditional insecticides, according to a new study.

Since Zika emerged as a threat to babies, it has been a mystery exactly how much of a danger the mosquito-borne virus poses to children.

But now, the largest study to follow kids who were exposed to the virus in the womb is providing more answers.

The study involved 1,450 babies who had been exposed to the virus, and who were 1-year-old by February 2018. Six percent were born with birth defects, and 14 percent developed problems that could be blamed on the virus by the time they turned 1, the study found.

A new treatment with the Zika virus might be able to target tumor cells in one of the deadliest childhood cancers. 

State Has Seen 59 Zika Cases This Year

Jul 25, 2018

While the number is down from the past two years, Florida has had 59 reported cases of the mosquito-borne Zika virus in 2018, according to a state Department of Health website.

Kate Stein / WLRN

This year, Miami-Dade County's arsenal of mosquito-fighting technology includes traps, spraying backpacks -- and mosquito-eating fish. 

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Most Floridians knew about the Zika virus and how it spread—but that wasn't enough to get them to protect themselves, according to a new study in the journal Risk Analysis.

As the Zika virus emerged in the United States two summers ago, researchers from the Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention surveyed more than 12,000 Americans. They asked people what they knew about Zika, and how they were reacting to it.

Danny Hwang

Peak mosquito season is coming and Miami-Dade County officials say they are ready to fight it with a new weapon: a bacteria that makes mosquitos sterile. 

Miami-Dade County Mayor Carlos Giménez said in a press conference Wednesday that the county will be using the Wolbachia bacteria to handle the Aedes Aegypti mosquito, which is seen as being primarily responsible for transmitting diseases like Dengue and Zika.

Creative Commons

As the rainy season returns — along with the disease-carrying mosquitoes that reproduce in standing water — the public is getting another chance to comment on one proposed method for fighting mosquitoes.

Tick-borne illnesses have more than doubled in the United States over the past decade. 

Amanda Rabines / WLRN News

Mosquito season has officially arrived in Florida, although many would argue it never left.

That perception may soon become reality, according to new studies that show the higher temperatures brought on by climate change are already increasing the range and biting season for many mosquitoes, including the Aedes aegypti — the infamous carriers of viruses like dengue and Zika, which hit Miami hard enough in 2016 to scare off many tourists.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Lab-bred mosquitoes are flying in South Miami. It’s the latest effort to stop the type of mosquito that spreads the Zika virus.

Thousands of bacteria-infected mosquitoes will be flying near Miami to test a new way to suppress insect populations that carry Zika and other viruses.

Two years ago, when the Zika virus was first identified as the cause of microcephaly in babies, women were scared. Expectant mothers who got infected had no idea what the chances were of having a healthy baby.

Researchers have since learned that while Zika infection is dangerous, about 94 percent of babies born to women infected with Zika appear to be normal at birth.

State Zika Cases Reach 200 In 2017

Oct 29, 2017

Florida has had 200 cases of the Zika virus in 2017, with most stemming from people who contracted the disease elsewhere and brought it into the state, according to information posted on the Florida Department of Health website.

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