© 2020 WLRN
MIAMI | SOUTH FLORIDA
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations
News
00000173-d94c-dc06-a17f-ddddb4e60000The grief and mourning continue for the 17 students and staff killed on the afternoon of Feb. 14 during a mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland. But something else is happening among the anguish of the interrupted lives of the victims and survivors. Out of the agony, activism has emerged and students from across South Florida are speaking out together asking for stricter gun controls.Here's a list of grief counseling resources available for the community

‘Alyssa’s Law,’ Named After Parkland Victim, Would Mandate Panic Alarms In Florida’s Public Schools

ZUKD3DLUCFCGPGEIFIDOUDDIBM.jpg
courtesy of Lori Alhadeff
Alyssa Alhadeff was one of 17 people who died in the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas School. A new law named after her would require silent panic alarms in Florida public schools.

Legislation named in honor of 14-year-old Alyssa Alhadeff, who was one of 17 people who died in the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas School, would require silent panic alarms in every public school building in Florida to alert police and rescuers to emergencies.

“We need to create layers and layers of protection to help keep our schools safe,” said Lori Alhadeff, Alyssa’s mother. “Alyssa’s Law, these silent panic alarms, is another layer of protection to help save lives.”

HB23 and SB70 arrive on the heels of legislation passed in February in New Jersey, where the Alhadeff family used to live, which requires the installation of panic alarms or “emergency mechanisms” in New Jersey’s public and secondary schools. The law had long been in the works but gained urgency after the Parkland mass shooting. The version that passed was named after Alyssa.

Read more at the Sun Sentinel.