Mark Schreiner

Mark Schreiner has been the producer and reporter for "University Beat" on WUSF 89.7 FM since 2001 and on WUSF TV from 2007-2017. 

In addition to serving as a producer, reporter, host and assistant news director, he serves as intern coordinator for WUSF News. 

He has worked as an anchor, reporter and producer at radio stations in Tampa and his native Chicago since 1992. Mark graduated from Columbia College in Chicago with a BA in Telecommunications/Radio in 1994.

Mark has won a number of honors as a reporter, including a pair of regional Edward R. Murrow awards, a Silver Telly award for the documentary, “Plant City Goes to War,” and multiple awards from the Associated Press Florida Broadcasters, the Society of Professional Journalists and the Tampa Bay Association of Black Journalists.

Contact Mark at 813-974-8693, on Twitter @wusfschreiner or by email at mschreiner@wusf.org.

Complete Scan Of Dozier School Grounds For Graves Scheduled

Jun 21, 2019

Forensic experts will return next month to the grounds of a notorious state reform school – where 51 sets of remains were unearthed in 2013 – to find out what lies in 27 additional sites.

University of South Florida anthropologists, led by Erin Kimmerle, will return to the former Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys in Marianna starting in mid-July.

DeSantis Signs Higher Education Changes

Jun 20, 2019

Gov. Ron DeSantis on Tuesday signed into a law a higher-education package that changes how public universities and colleges will fund construction projects, a top priority of House Speaker Jose Oliva, R-Miami Lakes.

The bill (SB 190) was prompted, in part, by a high-profile financial scandal at the University of Central Florida. The university was found to have misused millions of dollars in state funds for a construction project.

Since 2006, the University of South Florida has brought together FBI agents and students studying to become forensic investigators for a field training day.

In earlier versions, they’d meet on the Tampa campus or on the nearby grounds of MOSI and look at how the bodies of buried pigs decompose in Florida’s climate. But for the past few years, they’ve actually had a dedicated field – and real human bodies – to study.

Anyone who’s ever flown a drone can tell you – it’s not the easiest thing to do. Now imagine if the only way you could control that drone – is with your brain.

That’s the challenge 16 University of South Florida students faced recently at the school’s first ever Brain-Drone race.

If your New Year's resolution is cutting down on sweets and other foods that aren't good for you – you may want to follow your nose.

When the first Publix grocery store on a college campus in the country opens at the University of South Florida in Tampa Thursday morning, customers will notice a few differences.

Pinellas County Sheriff Bob Gualtieri is firing back at the Reverend Al Sharpton for speaking out against Florida's Stand Your Ground law.

In response to the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting that killed 17 people, Florida lawmakers passed a law in March requiring all schools in the state to have at least one armed and trained law enforcement officer or "school guardian."

Just in time for final exams, a pair of University of South Florida sophomore engineering students have come up with an app that allows people to match with the ideal study partner -- think "Tinder for study groups."

It's already been one of the worst flu seasons in recent memory. Now, you can add a late-blooming, but hard-hitting, allergy season to the list of reasons for some Florida residents' sinus miseries.

Even though Jane Austen died in 1817, the English author’s works – like “Sense and Sensibility” and “Pride and Prejudice” – have lived on for more than two hundred years.

Laura Runge, the chair of the University of South Florida Department of English, thinks she knows why.

Scientists say that climate change is having an effect on the levels of the world’s oceans.

But it’s also apparently affecting the oxygen levels throughout the oceans, as well as our coastal waters including the Gulf of Mexico.

An outside review has determined that the drowning death of Snooty the Manatee could have been prevented.

South Florida Museum CEO Brynne Anne Besio announced the findings Thursday in Bradenton after a review by animal welfare attorney James Gesualdi.

You probably know the Nietzsche quote: “That which does not kill us makes us stronger.”

One University of South Florida researcher is studying that adage – in nature.

The song said "it never rains in Southern California," but recent heavy downpours in Los Angeles have led the National Football League to switch the host city for the Super Bowl in 2021 from L.A. to Tampa.

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