Florida politics

The Florida Phoenix

The Everglades Foundation is kicking off a campaign to include the Everglades Reservoir in this year’s federal Water Resources Development Act bill. The reservoir is designed to move water away from Lake Okeechobee and reduce the spread of the discharge causing the toxic algae blooms on both coasts. The announcement comes days after Governor Rick Scott declared a State of Emergency as a result of the toxic algae blooms. Dr. Steven Davis is the chief ecologist at the Everglades Foundation. He joined Sundial to discuss the dangers of toxic algae. 


Hustle And Flow: How Philip Levine Made The Money That's Financing His Bid For Governor

Jul 11, 2018
Brynn Anderson / AP Photo/ Pool

Philip Levine has told the story so many times that it sounds like a fable.

With $500 in the bank, a young man opened a small office on South Beach, launched a cruise-line media company and created a tourism marketing empire that sold a decade later for a small fortune. The tale is the backbone of a campaign promoting a self-made, blue-collar businessman who as governor would change Tallahassee to make it work for its 21 million "customers."

Most new laws approved during Florida's recent legislative session took effect Sunday with the start of the state's fiscal year.

The new statutes have an effect on Floridians of all ages, from bullying in schools to providing further protections against seniors.

News Service of Florida

TALLAHASSEE --- More than 100 bills that Gov. Rick Scott signed into law from the 2018 legislative session will take effect Sunday, including a new state budget that tops $88 billion.

Lawmakers sent 195 bills to Scott from the session that ended in March. The governor vetoed two, while signing the rest.

Of the signed measures, 105 will hit the books Sunday. Of the remainder, 54 went into effect upon Scott’s signature, with the rest effective in October or in 2019.

Among the measures slated to take effect Sunday:

Peter Haden / WLRN

Florida voters have a chance to evaluate the Democratic candidates for governor tonight during a debate in Miramar.

All but one, that is.

Billionaire real estate investor and candidate Jeff Greene said there's a reason he won't be there.

"I wasn't invited," Greene said, laughing.

Greene entered the race for governor on June 4, too late to be included in tonight's debate. So, he'll watch this one from his home in Palm Beach with his wife and three sons.

Guests for Sundial on Tuesday, April 24 2018:

Dr. Susan MacManus is a political analyst and teaches political science at the University of South Florida. She spoke on the reasons why some members of Congress are not running for reelection and gave some perspective on upcoming state and national elections.

This year marks the 90th anniversary of the Tamiami Trail. It has been considered an engineering marvel, linking Miami to Naples on a 113-mile-long road that runs through the Everglades.

Updated at 2:05 p.m. ET

It's not that uncommon to hear someone complaining that politicians are corrupt. But you wouldn't expect to be thrown in jail for it.

That's exactly what happened to Fane Lozman at a City Council meeting in Florida.

This week’s student march on the Capitol in Tallahassee attracted media from all over the country.  That included The New Yorker Magazine.   Tom Flanigan caught up with the correspondent Emily Witt, who came to Florida to cover the impact of the Parkland school shooting, and where it fits in the larger debate over gun control, mental health and mass shootings.

CateComm, AP via Miami Herald

In a production filled with political theater, a Democratic candidate for governor and a legislative leader who’s toying with a run for the same office took the stage Tuesday night in a debate over immigration and “sanctuary cities.”

Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum and House Speaker Richard Corcoran, a Republican who hasn’t announced whether he’s in the gubernatorial race, came out slugging during the 45-minute debate, aired live on both men’s Facebook pages.

Miami Herald / Miami Herald

Guests for Sundial Tuesday, Feb. 13 2018:  

He gives us a rundown of how polling works and recounts his experience transitioning from AM radio host to podcaster.

Miami Herald sports reporter Manny Navarro speaks to us about the homecoming of the Miami Heat's star shooting guard Dwyane Wade.

Myrna and Sheldon Palley have a part of their glass art collection on display at the Palley Pavilion at the University of Miami’s Lowe Art Museum. The couple speak about how they developed an interest in glass art and how they began collecting.

WLRN News / Miami Herald

If you thought the first year of President Trump’s Administration was an unprecedented year in politics, just wait. 

2018 brings with it the midterm election, including the races for Florida governor, the U.S. Senate and House and the expiration of two federal immigration programs — Temporary Protected Status and Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals.

Plus, a passenger train service is supposed to get rolling between Miami, Fort Lauderdale and West Palm Beach. 

The Florida Supreme Court has tossed out a case challenging the governor's right to make last minute appointments. The justices say it’s too soon to review because the appointments haven't been made yet. Without a clear ruling, some are worried about a potential constitutional crisis. 

WLRN/Miami Herald

A lot has happened in the past 365 days.

A Category 4 hurricane plowed across the Florida Keys. President Obama ended the “wet foot, dry foot” policy for Cubans. The death toll related to Florida's opioid epidemic climbed higher. Venezuela sank further into economic and social chaos.

For the last episode of The Florida Roundup in 2017, editorial page editors from the Miami Herald, the Sun Sentinel and the Palm Beach Post — Nancy Ancrum, Rosemary O’Hara and Rick Christie — sat down with WLRN's Tom Hudson to review the year’s biggest news stories. 

Brendan Farrington / Miami Herald via AP

One of Florida’s most prolific Democratic donors, a bourbon-swilling, salty-tongued lawyer with his own slogan and medical marijuana as his pet cause, is out.

Pages