Miami-Dade County

Tim Padgett / WLRN.org

Last January, Miami-Dade County Mayor Carlos Gimenez agreed to a federal request to hand over undocumented immigrant detainees. That decision is controversial a year later, and on Tuesday immigration activists stepped up calls on Gimenez to reverse it.

Felipe Rivas

Hollywood has created its share of movies about teachers. And in most of those films, the teaching profession is seen as a noble, almost heroic, position in society. Teachers can be heroic, but it's never the same as in the movies.  

Miami Open

The Miami Open tennis tournament ended its brief stand-off with Miami-Dade on Tuesday, as county commissioners approved a compromise allowing the springtime event to move from Key Biscayne to Hard Rock Stadium in 2019.

Miami Herald

The public has until Dec. 12 to weigh in on whether Florida Power & Light should pass the $200 million clean-up tab for fixing leaking canals at Turkey Point on to customers.

Al Diaz / Miami Herald

Miami-Dade needs a community-wide "culture of resilience" before the next hurricane, a county commissioner argued in a new report.

"Every individual, every household needs to have an emergency plan. And that plan needs to be communicated with somebody who’s a lifeline," Commissioner Daniella Levine Cava wrote in the report on Hurricane Irma.

Terence Shepherd

By his own admission, Dr. Rolando Ochoa is not much of an air traveler.

But on a flight to San Diego a few years ago, it occurred to the Miami Dade College professor just what a trip his life has been so far. And the legs of the journey were far from ordinary: from child star in his native Cuba. to political refugee in his late teens, to budding music artist, to banker, to educator.

Now, they serve as chapters in his book, “Cuba 18, U.S. 50: My Fifty Year Trip.”

Carl Juste / Miami Herald

Seymour Gelber stood in front of a packed chamber at Miami Beach City Hall where he once presided as mayor. Now 98, with a dose of pride and humor, he swore his son Dan into the office he once held, commending him for his record of public service.

Seymour Gelber pointed out that even though Dan Gelber, 56, has held weighty positions in public life — federal prosecutor and a top lawmaker in Tallahassee — he’s never taken himself too seriously.

Kate Stein / WLRN

Hurricane Irma was over and the Monday after the storm all Leola Maedell wanted to do was go home.

The elderly Little River resident had been at the red metal picnic table outside Miami Edison Senior High School for four hours, waiting on the buses that would take her from the shelter back to her neighborhood.

drinking water
Getty images via Miami Herald / WLRN

People drinking tap water across the Miami area this week may notice the smell and taste of chlorine as Miami-Dade launches the annual cleaning of its underground pipes.

The “cleansing” began Monday and runs through Nov. 19. The county issued an advisory about the likelihood of changes in odor and taste in Miami-Dade’s drinking water.

Valencia Gunder / via Facebook

Responding to Facebook posts accusing them of unfairly dumping debris in underserved neighborhoods, Miami-Dade County officials said Tuesday the foliage downed by Irma is a problem shared by everyone in the county.

Kate Stein / WLRN

In the hours before Hurricane Irma came barreling towards Florida, Gloria Guity and her adult children went to five different shelters before they arrived at Miami Edison Senior High School.

“Here is better than where we were,” Guity, 76, said sitting at a cafeteria table. “Here I told them to put me next to the bathroom so at least I can take them to the bathroom.”

Douglas Hanks / Miami Herald

Miami-Dade commissioners on Tuesday rejected a ban on gay-conversion therapy for minors, saying the proposed crackdown would thrust local government into a parent’s right to make decisions about a child’s mental health and address matters of sexuality within the family.

Al Diaz / Miami Herald

Growing up in Miami, Luis Gazitúa lived through Hurricane Andrew in 1992 – one of the most destructive storms ever to hit South Florida. That’s why the Coconut Grove attorney recognized the awful danger of Hurricane Irma.

Irma was even bigger and stronger than Andrew. So when early forecast models this month showed it heading straight for Miami, Gazitúa and his family decided to evacuate South Florida.

“We had actually booked rooms in Orlando,” Gazitúa says at his law office in Coral Gables. “My father, my brother, our children and our wives and my mother.”

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