Miami

BRYAN CEREIJO / Miami Herald

South Florida celebrates Haitian Heritage month in May, spotlighting Haitian historical and cultural traditions. 

“A lot of people in South Florida, whether they are Haitian or not, it's an opportunity to learn more about the culture and to see the expressions of the culture," said Jacqueline Charles, the Caribbean reporter for the Miami Herald. "From artwork to music to dining.”

Florida has the most counties that celebrate Haitian Heritage month in the United States.

Pedro Portal / Miami Herald

President Trump’s national security advisor came to Miami on Wednesday to announce more get-tough measures on Cuba. But some re-tightening of Cuba policy - particularly a cutback in remittances to the island - will get more jeers than cheers from many Cuban-Americans.

Over the past few years, Miami native Trenise Bryant has seen her neighborhood, the African-American enclave of Liberty City, start to change. Bryant grew up in one of the area's oldest public housing projects, Liberty Square. Lately, rents have gone up, and Bryant has seen people priced out and forced to move away.

One factor driving this, Bryant says, is climate change.

ANDREW HARNIK / Associated Press

Miami won’t be the home of the 2020 Democratic convention, but the city will get to host the first debates among the top 20 candidates hoping to win the party’s nomination.

The Democratic National Committee announced Thursday that it’s selected Miami to host the party’s first debates, on June 26 and 27. The events will be televised on NBC, MSNBC and Telemundo, where the broadcast will include real-time Spanish translations.

Donna E. Natale Planas / Miami Herald

For a long time, it was much easier for Cubans to migrate to the United States than other immigrants. U.S. foreign policy was set up to give haven to people fleeing communism in our backyard. But that special status is rapidly changing.


Jose A. Iglesias / Miami Herald

One of the more disturbing sounds to hit the media airwaves last summer was a recording obtained by ProPublica of Central American children crying at an immigration detention center in Texas. They’d been separated from their parents, who had come to seek U.S. asylum.

At that same place the summer before, in 2017, a Guatemalan girl named Ana was taken from her father. She was three. Ana was sent to a relative in Immokalee, Florida, who took her to immigration lawyer Jennifer Anzardo Valdes in Miami.

History of Miami

In recognition of the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots, a new exhibition chronicles the history of Miami-Dade County’s LGBTQ community over the past 120 years. 

Daniel Varela / Miami Herald

Miami has the highest household vacancy rate among the nation’s 50 largest metro areas, according to a new study by the online loan marketplace, LendingTree.

Vacancies include housing that is for seasonal use or that is for sale or for rent and unoccupied. Using data recorded by the Census Bureau, LendingTree calculated that 17 percent of the Miami metro area’s 2.5 million households are vacant.

Sam Turken / WLRN

From a session on black women in the technology and media sectors to others on virtual reality, spatial computing and marketing, an annual festival in Miami this week aims to elevate people of color in the tech industry.

Attended by startup developers, government leaders and local high school students, BlackTech Week involves networking and discussions on how to create more opportunities for minority tech entrepreneurs.

Tim Padgett / WLRN.org

Venezuelans in South Florida woke up on Saturday to the first crack in the Venezuelan military’s loyalty to President Nicolás Maduro.

It was a video of Air Force General Francisco Yanez renouncing Maduro – the authoritarian leader widely condemned for trashing their homeland’s economy and democracy. Yanez insisted that “90 percent of the armed forces oppose Maduro,” and he called on other high-ranking officers to recognize National Assembly leader Juan Guaidó as Venezuela’s legitimate president – as the U.S. and many other countries have.

Tim Padgett / WLRN.org

There is another political crisis raging in Latin America besides Venezuela. That’s Nicaragua, where the authoritarian regime has all but criminalized independent journalism. But one Nicaraguan journalist exiled in Miami has won a measure of revenge.

Lily Oppenheimer / WLRN

Calle Ocho made way for three clomping camels on Sunday afternoon to celebrate Miami’s annual Three Kings Day Parade, also known as La Parada de los Reyes Magos

Sam Turken / WLRN

As Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro was sworn in to a second term on Thursday in Caracas, nearly a hundred Venezuelan-Americans and exiles protested in Miami against his recent reelection, calling it a sham.

The demonstrators held signs and yelled outside Venezuela’s consulate in Downtown, saying the election was just the latest corrupt action by Maduro's dictatorship. Already, more than a dozen countries across the world have refused to recognize his presidency.

Daniel Rivero / WLRN

Travelers visiting Miami this holiday season will be paying more for parking come New Year’s Day.

City commissioners recently decided on increasing parking rates for non-residents, who’ll be charged $3 or more per hour to park. If you live in the city and register through the PayByPhone app, you’ll pay $1.40 per hour.

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