Parkland school shooting

Do just one percent of licensed gun dealers supply more than half the guns recovered in crimes? And is Florida one of the only states that prohibits a gun registry? WUSF's Steve Newborn gets the answers from PolitiFact Florida's Allison Graves.

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Five weeks after they cowered under desks and hid in closets as a gunman roamed the hallways of their school with an AR-15, Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School students overwhelmed the streets of the nation’s capital along with hundreds of thousands of supporters from across the country.

Kyra Gurney / The Miami Herald

In the weeks leading up to the March For Our Lives in Washington, D.C., Marjory Stoneman Douglas High sophomore Ashley Baez wasn’t sure whether she wanted to go.

It wasn’t that the 15-year-old didn’t believe in fighting for stricter gun control laws.

It was that just over five weeks ago she had been shot in the leg when a gunman opened fire at her school. Now, Ashley walks with a cane. The thought of being in a crowd of strangers was terrifying.

Leslie Ovalle / WLRN

The first of more than 800 March For Our Lives events in Washington, D.C., the U.S. and around the world took place early on Saturday on the island of Pohnpei in the Pacific nation of Micronesia.

Here in South Florida, things kicked off, fittingly, in Parkland - which was the site of the February 14 mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School that killed 17 people and ignited the student-led #NeverAgain movement for stricter gun control and school safety. Marches were also held in Miami Beach, Boca Raton and Key West.

City of Parkland Vigil
WLRN

The primary March For Our Lives event is happening in Washington D.C. on Saturday, March 24, but there are also more than 830 marches scheduled worldwide to demand stricter gun control laws and an end to gun violence. 

Parkland
Caitie Switalski / WLRN

Parkland parents showed their outrage Wednesday night at a packed, and emotional, city commission meeting, after a series of security scares at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. 

“My fears have increased 100 percent this week with the increased activity by trespassers, weapons being brought on campus,” said Elyse Claprood, whose daughter attends Stoneman Douglas High. “We can’t live in this bubble anymore in this city.”

 

Getty images via Miami Herald

Floridians will not vote on adding gun control measures to the state constitution this year because a state board, citing technical rules, rejected the proposals Wednesday.

The 37-member Constitutional Review Commission is an obscure yet powerful body that meets every 20 years to propose changes to the Florida constitution, which are then put on the November ballot. During a marathon meeting in the Capitol, several commissioners from both parties tried to add three different gun-related amendments to a proposal related to land ownership.

Associated Press

Gov. Rick Scott has ordered eight Florida Highway Patrol troopers to beef up security at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, where gunman Nikolas Cruz killed 14 students and three staff members and injured 17 others last month in one of the nation’s worst school shootings.

Florida’s new gun safety law includes the creation of a commission tasked with investigating the failings that led up to last month’s mass school shooting in Parkland. Governor Rick Scott and Florida legislative leaders made their appointments Tuesday.

Associated Press

Alarmed by his repeated visits to Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School and his infatuation with his sibling’s notoriety as a mass murderer, prosecutors and police moved Tuesday to keep the younger brother of Parkland shooter Nikolas Cruz locked up on trespassing charges and to strip him of his ability to own a gun.

A Broward County judge set a $500,000 bond Tuesday for Zachary Cruz, who was caught skateboarding Monday on the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School grounds where brother Nikolas Cruz killed 17 people in February.

Prosecutors asked for $750,000. The standard bond for trespassing on school grounds is $25 and Cruz, 18, had paid it, his bond attorney said.

“He’s being held because of who he’s related to, not because of what he did,” Cruz’s bond attorney argued before Judge Kim Theresa Mollica.

Associated Press

Zachary Cruz, the brother of confessed Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooter, Nikolas Cruz, was arrested Monday after deputies say he trespassed onto the school’s Parkland campus.

The 18-year-old was warned several times not to be on school grounds, according to the Broward Sheriff’s Office.

“Defendant Cruz surpassed all locked doors and gates and proceeded to ride his skateboard through school grounds,” a deputy wrote in his arrest report.

Zachary Cruz was spotted at about 4:30 p.m. after students had been dismissed for the day.

Miami Herald

Officials were so concerned about the mental stability of the student accused of last month's Florida school massacre that they decided he should be forcibly committed.

 

But the recommendation was never acted upon.

A commitment under the law would have made it more difficult if not impossible for Nikolas Cruz to obtain a gun legally.

Cruz is accused of the shooting rampage that killed 14 students and three school employees at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland on Feb. 14. In addition, 17 people were wounded.

Screenshot

They’ve gone to Tallahassee and Washington D.C. They’ve appeared on talk shows and taken on the National Rifle Association. They’ve raised more than $3 million to combat gun violence.

Now the five teens behind the #NeverAgain movement that was born in the wake of the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School have appeared on “60 Minutes” talking about how they’ve been able to accomplish things adults haven’t been able to.

For Philip Schentrup, whose daughter Carmen was among the students killed at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., each day brings the same, sharp pain. The same search for answers that don't come.

"To be honest, it's the same day I live over and over," he says. "Since February 14, this is every day. Every day of trying to hold yourself together."

"You search for normalcy, a 'new normal,'" he says, then pauses.

"I say those words. I don't really know what they mean yet."

It's been one month since the mass shooting at Stoneman Douglas.

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