Ultra Music Festival

Carl Juste / MIAMI HERALD

On this Tuesday, June 2, episode of Sundial:

The Third Day Of Protests In South Florida

Protests over the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis at the hands of white officers continued in parts of South Florida on Monday for the third day in a row. There were no arrests that day and curfews remain in effect for Miami-Dade, Broward and West Palm Beach counties.

The Truth Has Changed / Courtesy

On this Monday, March 9, episode of Sundial:

Rep. Ted Deutch talks about COVID-19 response 

U.S. Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz and Ted Deutch held a roundtable on Monday morning at Nova Southeastern University to discuss the spread of the coronavirus or COVID-19, prevention techniques and possible impacts on South Florida.

Deutch says one of the challenges is testing kits: “No one can identify the number of tests available in Florida,” says Deutch. “That’s the first order of business for me.”

Ultra Music Festival In Miami Canceled Over Coronavirus Fear, Sources Say

Mar 5, 2020
Pedro Portal / Miami Herald

The 2020 Ultra Music Festival will be postponed — possibly for a full year, which would effectively cancel this year’s edition of Miami’s marquee electronic dance music event, the Miami Herald has learned.

ALEXIA FODERE / MIAMI HERALD

Ultra Music Festival has a signed agreement — finally — from the city of Miami to return to Bayfront Park in March.

Festival organizers and city administrators signed the revocable license agreement Jan. 16, only two months before the three-day event is scheduled to open March 20. The deal was inked the day after the Miami Herald published an article about the lack of an agreement and two days after a group of downtown residents sued the city to invalidate the deal that allows the electronic dance music event to use the downtown waterfront.

Alexia Fodere / Miami Herald

Ultra Music Festival is selling tickets for its scheduled return to Bayfront Park in March 2020, but organizers do not yet have a contract to stage the three-day concert on Miami’s downtown waterfront.

Four months after Miami commissioners voted to allow the event to return to Bayfront Park, city administrators and Ultra’s organizers have not signed the licensing agreement that would allow the electronic dance music festival to use the public park.

Alexia Fodere / Miami Herald

Ultra Music Festival will return to downtown Miami, a remarkable development just two months after the homegrown event seemed destined to move out of the city, far from its longtime home on the waterfront.

Matias J. Ocner / MIAMI HERALD

In the telenovela of Miami politics, the relationship between City Hall and Ultra Music Festival might be one of its greatest on-again, off-again romances.

WLRN

Miami has been home to the Ultra Music Festival for more than 20 years, attracting thousands of electronic dance music fans to the city each year. But last week, Ultra decided not to renew its contract with the city, terminating a two year contract agreement for the festival to be hosted on Virginia Key Beach.

Matias J. Ocner/Miami Herald

After a messy first year at their new location on Virginia Key, Ultra organizers are pulling out of the venue bordering sensitive wildlife areas and the University of Miami's Rosenstiel campus.

The Miami Herald reported organizers sent a letter to the city Wednesday saying they wanted out.

The decision comes a day before city commissioners were scheduled to vote on whether to allow the thunderous three-day music festival to return next year.

Miami Herald Archive

Ultra Music Festival stressed out some of the University of Miami’s research fish more than being chased by a predator would have.

A preliminary analysis done by UM scientists show toadfish, a species that is common to Biscayne Bay with a physiology that lends itself to study of stress response, heard the music and exhibited acute stress levels during Ultra’s first day on Virginia Key. The report shows the fish were less stressed than if they were in a crowded tank but more stressed than if they heard the pop sounds from a dolphin, a species with a taste for toadfish.

Matias Ocner / Miami Herald

In a surprise move, the Miami City Commission on Thursday unanimously voted down a contract for Ultra Music Festival to stay in Bayfront Park.

Caught in the fray of a political grudge match between two commissioners and mixed public opinion, Ultra Music Festival’s future in downtown Miami was dealt a significant setback when commissioners rejected the contract. Downtown residents who oppose the festival left City Hall smiling and high-fiving each other as festival organizers quietly conferred outside the commission chambers.

K. Lepri / WLRN

 

 

One of Miami’s most popular music festivals is back.

The Ultra Music Festival is expected to draw tens of thousands of people Friday through Sunday to Bayfront Park in downtown Miami, an area surrounded by high-rise buildings.

 

Traffic + Noise Disturbance = Ultra

Mar 18, 2016
John Power / WLRN

Ultra Music Festival kicked off Friday, but not everyone is “Ultra-excited”.

Since 2001 , Ultra has been taking over downtown Miami. It's gotten bigger each year, and the city and its residents have felt its growth.

“I understand that Ultra brings a lot of money, but it does bring a lot of inconveniences,” said Nadia Sloley, who works at the  Vizcayne Condo Building, 253 NE Second St., a short distance from the festival site.

This year Miami police will be rerouting traffic throughout the weekend.

Helado Negro

He’s been called a “sound artist,” and a “sonic stylist.”  His music has been described as “genre-defying.”  It seems that fans and music critics alike are always struggling to describe exactly what Roberto Carlos Lange does for a living.

“I struggle with it,” says Lange with a smile.

The Brooklyn-based, South Florida-born artist says he’s not into labels.  “When people label something, I oppose it,” he says. “And, so then, I sabotage that label.”

But a metaphor?  That’s a different story.  Take his stage name: Helado Negro, Spanish for black ice cream.

Today on WLRN-Miami Herald News, you heard:

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