water quality

Miami Waterkeeper

The environmental advocacy group Miami Waterkeeper is suing Miami-Dade County for allegedly violating the Clean Water Act after finding a sewage pipe that might have been leaking into the ocean for almost a year.

The Waterkeepers filed a notice of intent to sue in 60 days. The lawsuit will ask the county to fix this leak and inspect all outfall pipes, as well as suggest that the county contribute to the Biscayne Bay restoration trust fund, instead of paying civil penalties.

Activists are abandoning a federal challenge of Florida’s water quality standards after the Trump Administration refused to step in.

Monroe County

To improve water quality near shore, the Florida Keys has spent hundreds of millions over the last 20 years upgrading wastewater treatment systems and improving how stormwater is handled.

The lead contamination in Flint, Michigan and the sewage spills in St. Petersburg are only two of many examples of why more consumers are asking questions about the quality of their own drinking water.

That's one of the findings of a new survey being released this week by the Water Quality Association, a national trade organization representing the water treatment industry.

Negron’s Water Plan Filed In Florida House

Feb 13, 2017

Rep. Thad Altman, R-Rockledge, filed a House bill Friday to match a controversial $2.4 billion proposal — backed by Senate President Joe Negron — to buy farmland south of Lake Okeechobee.

A coalition calling itself Stand Up North Florida went public Monday. It says it wants more state water conservation money to go to North and Central Florida. Representing the group were local and state politicians and business leaders. Environmentalists were notably absent.

Septic Tank Inspections Sought As Part Of Home Sales

Jan 19, 2017

Pointing in part to water-quality problems in the Indian River Lagoon, a Brevard County House member Wednesday proposed requiring septic-tank inspections as part of the sales of homes and other types of real estate.

Everglades Water Quality Nearly At Acceptable Levels

Dec 19, 2016

After more than two decades of work to restore water quality in the Florida Everglades it’s now nearing federal and state standards.


Scientists Seek Re-Evaluation of Everglades Restoration

Dec 19, 2016

A committee of scientists is recommending a re-evaluation of a $16 billion restoration of the Florida Everglades, the largest in American history.


Water containing low-level radiation and other pollutants has poured into Florida's primary drinking water aquifer through a gaping sinkhole 45 feet wide.

It happened at a plant owned by fertilizer giant Mosaic in central Florida's rural Polk County, Robin Sussingham of member station WUSF reports.

An attorney representing three central Florida residents in a federal lawsuit against Mosaic says the legal action is about ensuring safe drinking water. The proposed class-action suit was filed after a sinkhole beneath a Mosaic plant near Lakeland sent 200 million gallons of waste water into the Floridan aquifer.

The lawsuit is the first against Mosaic since the phosphate and potash producer, the world’s largest, reported the sinkhole to government agencies in late August.

  

The state has received reports of more than 268 million gallons of sewage that spilled onto roads and into water around Florida so far this year and nearly 95 percent of it happened in Pinellas County during Hurricane Hermine.


Federal lawmakers from Florida are criticizing the state’s recent decision to allow for higher levels of toxins in its waterways. They’re worried about public health because some of the toxins cause cancer.

The Florida Environmental Regulation Commission approved increased levels for about 20 different toxins in Florida surface waters, like rivers and estuaries. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency would still have to approve the move.

Nine members of Congress recently sent the EPA a letter voicing their concern.

FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

Local transmission of Zika by mosquitoes has been confirmed in Miami-Dade and Broward County. What does this mean for South Florida residents?

The Environmental Regulation Commission recently voted for new standards for more than 80 different toxic chemicals, some of them carcinogens, and just how much of each we’re going to allow in our water supply. Environmental groups claim we are putting Floridian’s health in danger. We’ll take a closer look at exactly what it is we’re putting in our water.

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Thousands of swimmers are celebrating the 4th of July weekend by jumping in the water in Miami Beach. But if you want to know how clean the water has been, the answer could cost you nearly $73 thousand.

That’s what Miami Beach officials wanted to charge Jenny Staletovich, who covers environmental issues for the Miami Herald.

Earlier this month, she reported on a study that found high levels of human waste and bacteria related to storm water pumps.

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