Dance

Karolina Kuras

It took some doing, but Miami City Ballet finally got an elusive bird to leave its nest in Manhattan and fly down south.

“So this wonderful ballet with such rich history and extraordinary choreography really had never been seen outside of New York. And I thought, ‘How equitable is that?,’ “ Miami City Ballet Artistic Director Lourdes Lopez says. “Why should the Northeast have all the fun?"

Jon Boogz And Lil Buck Bring 'Love Heals All Wounds' To The Arsht

Feb 6, 2020
Courtesy of artist management

South Florida-raised dancer/choreographer Jon Boogz has always wanted to use dance to tell stories that matter.

Growing up, the only things he loved as much as dancing were issue-driven films such as “Schindler’s List” and “The Color Purple.” As a street dancer in the style called popping, however, Boogz was in a world where success typically means getting on TV shows, touring with pop stars, winning competitions, and constantly upping your virtuosity. Not breaking hearts, opening minds, or changing worlds. He wanted more.

Miami City Ballet, New World Symphony Unite For 'A Monumental Collaboration'

Jan 29, 2020
Courtesy of Alexander Iziliaev

If only one titan, Atlas, could support the Earth on his shoulders, for two together would even the sky be the limit?

The 20th century experienced just that when choreographer George Balanchine and composer and pianist Igor Stravinsky collaborated in Paris and Washington, D.C., in 1928 on their ground-shifting ballet, “Apollo.” Their artistic partnership shifted the tectonics of both classical dance and music.

Simon Soong

Earth, air, fire and water.

In many cultures, those are the four elements of life on our planet. The contemporary dance company, Dance NOW! Miami, kicks off its 20th anniversary season Saturday, Dec. 21, with an original work that puts each of those elements in the spotlight.

"Elemental" is the work of choreographer and Dance NOW! Miami co-founder Diego Salterini. It’s comprised of four vignettes — with each piece conceived as its own entity and as a unit.

Lily Oppenheimer / WLRN

With Miami Art Week in full swing, there’s a lot of art galleries and shows geared towards travelers descending upon South Florida. Some of the highlights have been a giant, contorted “Bent Pool” that arches over Pride Park, and a life-sized traffic jam sculpted out of sand near Lincoln Road. 

Courtesy of Marisol Blanco

For the last 12 years, Marisol Blanco has been fighting against numbers. 

Specifically, she has been hard at work dispelling the notion that dancing Salsa is about counting steps and following a mechanical style. "That's just atrophying the brain of dancers," she says.

 

For this Havanera, who hails from the the culturally rich Guanabacoa neighborhood, it's all about understanding the African history of Cuban music, how it has created its percussion and steps. Then the rest – and the body – just follows. 

Lily Oppenheimer / WLRN

Smells of pikliz, arroz con pollo, Publix fried chicken and other homemade Miami potluck staples wafted out of the Adrienne Arsht Center as parents, guardians and friends  gathered to see a culmination of what their kids learned from the six-week-long immersive AileyCamp. 

Roi Lemayh

A new dance performance in Miami will take the influence of LGBTQ ballroom culture onto the stage.

“Vogue Extravaganza” pays homage to the ballroom scene that originated in New York, an underground subculture created by and for black and Latino gay and gender non-conforming young people.

Sam Turken / WLRN

The New York City-based Alvin Ailey Dance Theater held a public workshop Wednesday night, giving local dancers across South Florida a chance to learn some of the company’s iconic choreography.

During the nearly two-hour training session at the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts, more than thirty participants followed the steps and rhythms of two Alvin Ailey dancers. The workshop was a way for the theater—which is performing in Miami this week—to carry out the mission of its founder Alvin Ailey, said company dancer Jacquelin Harris.

Paul Kolnik

The Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater is celebrating 60 years this season.

On a recent visit to Miami, Artistic Director Robert Battle said the company is rooted in a deep history of addressing social justice through dance. Dance, he said, is a form of both protest and celebration. 

In past works the company has explored the civil rights movement, black womanhood and mass incarceration.

David DeSilvia / Courtesy

A dance festival is trying to break through misconceptions about disabled dance performers.

The Forward Motion Dance Festival, being held Sept. 26 to Sept. 29, will showcase groundbreaking physically integrated dance companies and choreography. A conference will focus on the representation of individuals with disabilities in the arts and media. The festival features disabled and non-disabled artists from around the globe. It was funded by grants from the Knight Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts. 

Jessica Bakeman / WLRN News

Half of the percussion section is lined up along a classroom wall, with whiteboards to their backs. Each young boy is shaking a shekere — a West African instrument made from a dried gourd and covered with a colorful beaded netting.

The rest of the musicians are sitting nearby in blue plastic chairs with djun djun and djembe drums at their feet. They bang on the instruments with one or two wooden sticks — or just their hands.

They’re laying down the beat for the girls, who are jumping and moving their bodies like waves to the music.

Ballet Flamenco La Rosa

The Tennessee Williams drama “Summer and Smoke” may not be as well-known as some of his other plays, like “Cat On A Hot Tin Roof,” or “A Streetcar Named Desire.” But as its name implies, it smolders just the same.

Set in a Mississippi town at the turn of the last century, it tells the story of a minister’s daughter and her relationship with the young doctor who grew up next door. It’s a play where piety battles sensuality, the spirit is at war with the flesh -- and a man and a woman are always facing off about all of it.

Isanusi García Rodríguez’s artwork reflects a timeline: different periods of recovery since 2012, when he suffered a stroke.

Rodríguez used to express himself through dancing. He danced in a number of productions with Miami City Ballet. The stroke left the right side of his body paralyzed; he was not able to communicate and had amnesia for months. During those months, many of his memories would reappear. That prompted him to pick up a paint brush and make the canvas his medium of communication.   

Miami Herald reporter Doug Hanks has been following closely the race to represent District 5 at the Miami-Dade County Commission. This is the first time in 20 years the seat has opened. Hanks talked to Sundial about the candidates, their platforms and the significance of this race.

List of voting place for District 5 on May 22 can be found here.

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