King Tide

Tom Hudson / WLRN News

Water is what connects us in South Florida. No matter where we are from or how we got here, or where we live or work, water surrounds us. And this time of year, the rising seas, driven by the pull of the sun and moon, can spill over our edges, bubble up from below and seep into our lives.

Florida Center for Environmental Studies

How much do you know about sea-level rise?

How severe is the threat? And what are communities in South Florida doing to deal with higher waters?

On Monday night from 6-8 p.m., WLRN is hosting a town hall exploring the fundamentals of sea-level rise.

Emily Michot / Miami Herald

Floridians pay a price for living on the coast.

 

Hurricane Michael, which made landfall just shy of a Category 5 storm, ravaged the Panhandle and Big Bend area. The storm destroyed neighborhoods and washed out roads – changing lives forever.

Katie Lepri / WLRN News

Many parts of South Florida appear to have escaped the worst impacts of King Tide flooding this week — at least compared with tidal flooding the previous two Octobers.

King tides in October 2017 came on the heels of record-setting summer rains and Hurricane Irma. In October 2016, a rare “super moon” intensified the highest of the high tides, which can cause water to bubble up through storm drains and into streets, corroding cars and impeding traffic.

 

Florida Atlantic University
Alex Dolce, Florida Atlantic University / WLRN

Florida Atlantic University student Bridget Huston is collecting stories from people in her community about flooding. 

With a team at the university's Florida Center For Environmental Studies, she's looking at flood maps, or projections for how high water is estimated to rise during floods. Then she's comparing them to people's accounts of what flooding looks like in their own neighborhoods. She said she hopes the personal accounts make flood maps even more accurate. 

Stranahan House
Caitie Switalski / WLRN

On the banks of the New River, the 117-year old Historic Stranahan House and Museum is the oldest building in Fort Lauderdale. It was home to the city’s founding family, Frank and Ivy Stranahan. 

But in recent years, it has suffered the effects of climate change, according to the museum’s Executive Director, April Kirk.

 

Kate Stein / WLRN

In Florida, poop in the water is... a problem we all live with.

City of Key West

Local governments in the Keys are challenging residents to document the especially high tides of autumn with a "king tide photo challenge."

High tides from Nov. 3-7 are expected to reach more than 2 feet above sea level, according to a press release from the city of Key West. Winds are expected to push the tides even higher along the northeast sides of the Keys.

"Building a photographic library of current flood conditions due to natural events, like high tides, is an important step to addressing the most vulnerable areas," according to the city's press release.

Carl Juste / Miami Herald

Excess water from Hurricane Irma is still making its way through Florida, exacerbating the significant water management challenges the state's faced this rainy season.

C.M. Guerrero / Miami Herald

King tides caused widespread flooding throughout South Florida in October and November. From Key West to West Palm Beach, pedestrians waded through streets and drivers moved their cars from massive parking lot puddles.

 

But December’s king tides? They’ve been going on this week and flooding has been minimal. That's because calmer weather has kept high tides down in December, compared with earlier this year.

 

Emily Michot / Miami Herald

A seasonal king tide boosted by a rare super moon over the weekend may continue to trigger flooding around South Florida through Wednesday, National Weather Service forecasters warned Monday.

High tides were expected to reach three feet or higher along the South Florida coast beginning Monday and continuing through Wednesday and possibly Thursday. That’s expected to trigger some flooding, forecasters said in an advisory Monday. The super moon, making its closest pass to the Earth in nearly seven decades, is amplifying the seasonal king tide.

Peter Haden / WLRN

“Does the property flood during the king tides?”

Fort Lauderdale Realtor Julie Jones says that is one of the first things her buyers ask these days. 

“The days of just smiling sweetly and saying, ‘Oh no, it’s not a problem,’ are clearly gone,” she said.

Jones gathered with other business people, scientists and local officials Monday in a Fort Lauderdale conference room …  with the water rising outside the building. They had a message to South Florida and Washington: We need to do something.

Nancy Klingener / WLRN

A Super Blood Moon, king tide and Hurricane Joaquin all came together this week to flood South Florida.

The king tide and Sunday's supermoon brought several inches of water to Key West, Miami Beach and Fort Lauderdale. Meanwhile, Hurricane Joaquin continues to rough up the surf off the coast of South Florida.

KEENPRESS Photography/flickr

The Evangelical Environmental Network (EEN) has taken up the cause of climate change in Florida. The national group claims 600,000 members or supporters around the country with more than 100,000 of them in Florida. It's funded by donations and grants.

EEN is part of the Floridians for Solar Choice coalition, which is pushing a constitutional amendment that would allow Floridians to buy electricity directly from someone other than a utility company.

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