Environment

In South Florida, where the Everglades meet the bays, environmental challenges abound. Sea level rise threatens homes and real estate. Invasive species imperil native plants and animals. Pesticides reduce the risk of mosquito-borne diseases, but at what cost? 

WLRN's award-winning environment reporting strives to capture the color and complexity of human interaction with one of the most biodiverse areas of the planet.

Jose A. Iglesias / El Nuevo Herald

North Bay Village, an island community literally scraped from the bottom of Biscayne Bay, now has a problem with waters that surround it.

Ellis Rua / Associated Press

Florida’s Republican lawmakers are looking at new ways to address climate change in the state.  It’s part of a shift in policy when it comes to addressing environmental issues.  The sea change comes as younger republicans ditch old policies, which included not even using the words climate change.

Scientists have discovered a mash-up of two feared disasters — hurricanes and earthquakes — and they're calling them "stormquakes."

Katie Lepri/WLRN

Some of the most dramatic sea rise around South Florida has occurred in the last two decades: at least five inches near Virginia Key since 1992.

Nirmal Mulaikal / WLRN News

South Florida artists and performers came together Thursday night to fight climate change at The Frank art gallery in Pembroke Pines. 

The exhibit, known as “Art for the Earth: Artists on Climate Change”, featured a theatrical performance, visual artwork and spoken poetry. 

One of the foundations of American agriculture is under attack on several fronts. The victims - bees. WUSF visits one beekeeper in Polk County who has to drive thousands of miles every year to keep his hives humming.

Red tide is back in Southwest Florida’s Gulf waters.

 


Al Diaz/Miami Herald

If the past is any indication, worsening threats from climate change, like rising seas in South Florida, could take a larger toll on the poor as people are forced to abandon their homes.

Wilfredo Lee/AP

Dirty beaches in the wake of record-setting king tides across South Florida this week should come as no surprise, scientists say.

“No, there’s not any coincidence,” said Florida International University geochemist and water quality expert Henry Briceno.

Just days after record-setting tides, Florida Department of Health officials issued warnings Thursday about unsafe levels of bacteria at four Miami-Dade County beaches: Crandon Park’s North Beach, Virginia Key, Cape Florida and Surfside at 93rd Street. They told swimmers to stay out of the water.

The Ocean Agency

A report recently released by the United Nations's International Panel on Climate Change finds that oceans around the world are in trouble.

More than 100 scientists from 36 countries worked on the report that shows carbon emissions from human activities are putting a dire strain on ocean health.

 

The findings have big implications for South Florida, where much of life revolves around the water.

WLRN

The sex of sea turtle hatchlings is determined by the temperature. So as it gets hotter, there are more female turtles. That trend is worrying scientists that there could eventually be too few male turtles for the species to keep reproducing.

Agriculture Commissioner Nikki Fried on Thursday plans to roll out legislative priorities focused on climate change. 

Douglas R. Clifford / Tampa Bay Times via Miami Herald

Florida’s first-ever climate change czar visited Miami-Dade on Tuesday, and local leaders hope the newly created role signals a new era of help from Tallahassee in the difficult — and expensive — battle to adapt to rising seas.

“We’ve been kind of flying by ourselves here for a while,” said Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos Gimenez. “All of our efforts are really borne by the people of Miami-Dade.”

Gerald Herbert / AP Photo

Xavier Cortada / Courtesy

South Florida artist Xavier Cortada is very concerned about sea-level rise and needs your help. 

For more than 15 years, Cortada has been painting colorful murals of mangroves all over Miami-Dade County to raise awareness about the threat of climate change to South Florida. There's the Miami Mangrove Forest located in downtown Miami on the Interstate-95 underpass and the Reclamation Project located on store fronts of Lincoln Road on Miami Beach.

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