Sundial

Monday through Thursday at 1 p.m.

There's no place anywhere else in the country quite like South Florida. From the Keys all the way up the Palm Beaches , WLRN's new daily program Sundial brings you the stories that make our home unique. Interviews about news, politics, music, sports, arts, and food, all with a local twist.

Are you a book lover? Sundial has a monthly book club dedicated to read, share and discuss books and characters that are unique to South Florida. You can join the conversation here.

Do you love live music? Sundial brings you the best of the local music scene in its Live from the 305 concerts. Check out the latest performance, as well as a conversation with the artists, here

David DeSilvia / Courtesy

A dance festival is trying to break through misconceptions about disabled dance performers.

The Forward Motion Dance Festival, being held Sept. 26 to Sept. 29, will showcase groundbreaking physically integrated dance companies and choreography. A conference will focus on the representation of individuals with disabilities in the arts and media. The festival features disabled and non-disabled artists from around the globe. It was funded by grants from the Knight Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts. 

Brian Demby / Courtesy

Miami’s Lemon City Trio (LCT) is bringing a fresh new meaning to the word funk.

Brian Robertson, 35, on organ; Nick Tannura, 28, on guitars and Aaron Glueckauf, 27, on drums are the musicians behind the funky jazz-soul sound that makes up Lemon City Trio. They met in Miami, decided to join forces to create a band and began rehearsing at a warehouse located in the Lemon City, a neighborhood in Miami that dates back to the mid-19th Century and overlaps now with Little Haiti.

AL DIAZ / Miami Herald

More than a year after Hurricane Irma, blue tarps still lay on roofs across South Florida. According to the Miami Herald, tens of thousands of homeowners across the state are still waiting for assistance to pay for damages to their houses and many have sued insurance companies.

More than a year after Hurricane Irma, blue tarps still lay on roofs across South Florida. According to the Miami Herald, tens of thousands homeowners statewide are still waiting for assistance to pay for damages to their houses and many have sued insurance companies.

Florida International University / Courtesy

A Florida International University assistant professor of psychology is working to find ways to combat non-consensual porn, or sexually graphic images that are shared without consent.

Alexander Mijares Instagram / Courtesy

Florida International University Psychologist Asia Eaton is one of the lead researchers in the fight against “revenge porn.” Eaton recently traveled to Facebook’s headquarters to join victim’s advocates in a conversation about how the social media giant can help prevent the spread of explicit material online. Sexting and the sharing of nude material without victims’ consent remains a critical problem in the digital age and can be a difficult crime to prosecute.

Kaylee Rodriguez

Miami-native Juan Vidal considers himself a "Rap Dad": a father who has been raised with and informed by hip-hop culture. That's also the name of his new book, which examines the intersection of hip-hop and fatherhood.

In the book, Vidal details his life as a traveling hip-hop artist, a father of four kids and a successful writer and music critic. He examines fathers in hip-hop who are changing the mainstream narrative about fathers of color being absent in their children's lives.

Miami Herald

It's been more than six months since a bridge collapsed at Florida International University, killing six people. The Miami Herald has been following the story since its collapse. Last month the paper broke a story that showed that engineers who worked on the bridge reported cracks before its collapse. Now the newspaper is reporting that the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, OSHA, has fined five companies more than $80,000 for several work safety violations related to the bridge.

Jennine Capó Crucet / Courtesy

Cuban-American author Jennine Capó Crucet has taken her “very Miami” teaching style and pineapple tights to Nebraska.

Her book, “Make Your Home Among Strangers,” is the first title of the Sundial Book Club. It follows a young Cuban-American woman, Lizet Ramirez, as she goes from her life in Hialeah to an elite private school in the Northeast. Ramirez is then pulled between life at college and home, finding herself in the middle of a national immigration debate in Miami. 

University of Miami's Concussion Program / Courtesy

The University of Miami’s Sports Medicine Institute concussion program is testing a medical marijuana pill for high school football players. 

The Dade Heritage Trust / Courtesy

Last week, both chambes of parliament in Haiti voted in favor of a new Prime Minister, Jean-Henry Céant. Residents are hoping the change in government will help stabilize the nation. Earlier this summer, fuel prices in Haiti rose by 51 percent, leaving the country in economic turmoil. Sundial talked to Miami Herald reporter Jacqueline Charles, who reports on Haiti, about what a new prime minister means for the nation.

ACLU

The American Civil Liberties Union of Florida (ACLU of Florida) has taken a public stance on a number of the constitutional amendments Floridians are supposed to vote on in November.

Shira Lee / Courtesy

Miami based artist Shira Lee is something of a renaissance woman.

She’s a folk and jazz musician in several different bands and an actress and a writer, playing a lead role in the recently released web-series GROWN, which follows the story of two young Haitian-American men making their way in Miami. Lee is also the brainchild behind the “Babawagon,” a mobile performance space here in South Florida funded by the Knight Foundation.

Commissioner / Courtesy

The South Florida chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) will host a panel Sunday, Sept. 23 that will look at all of the constitutional amendments on the November ballot. The ACLU has taken a public stance on a number of the amendments, including Amendment 4 (voting rights for felons), Amendment 6 (Marsy’s Law Amendment) and Amendment 11 (immigrants owning property). Melba Pearson is the Deputy Director for the ACLU Florida.

Alejandra Martinez

The city of Doral has a majority immigrant population; 82 percent are Hispanic, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. As of last year, 28 percent of Doral's 59,000 residents are Venezuelan-born, or more than one in four people, according to the mayor's office.

Doral Mayor Juan Carlos Bermudez, who was born in Cuba, says that in order for the city's huge immigrant population to play a role in the region’s economy, newly arrived immigrants must learn the "rules" of the game.

Pages