Amendment 4

Daniel Rivero / WLRN

Like many Floridians who have been convicted of a felony, Clarence Office, 61, was excited to register to vote on January 8, when the state’s Amendment 4 went into effect.

News Service Of Florida

Following a messy election, a fresh political season is set to begin in Florida. New state leaders will be sworn in Jan. 8, including incoming Florida Governor Ron DeSantis.

Although he still has a few decisions to make on key positions, DeSantis and his team have worked to fill hundreds of jobs in the administration, including for some of the state’s most prominent posts.

Meanwhile, state lawmakers are filing bills for the 2019 Legislative session that begins in March.

Court Battle Over Felons' Rights Could End

Dec 20, 2018
News Service of Florida

Though debate continues to swirl about carrying out a newly approved constitutional amendment, a fierce legal battle about how Gov. Rick Scott and Florida Cabinet members have handled restoration of felons’ rights could be close to ending.

When Will Amendment 4 Be Implemented?

Dec 14, 2018
MIAMI HERALD FILE 2013

More than one million felons in Florida are supposed to be able to register to vote in a little over three weeks. 

Amendment 4 —the ‘Voting Restoration Amendment’ — was approved by 65 percent of voters on Nov. 6, amending the state constitution to return the right to vote to most felons after they’ve served their sentences. It goes into effect January 8.

Leslie Ovalle / WLRN News

With its passage on November 6, Amendment 4 granted over a million felons across the state the right to vote.

Courtesy of ACLU Florida

After 40 years of leading American Civil Liberties Union chapters in Michigan and Florida, Howard Simon is calling it quits.

He’ll remain in Florida, and plans to stay active, but will relocate from Miami to the Gulf Coast. The end of a long career with such a venerable organization might normally elicit polite plaudits from across the political spectrum. But that’s not necessarily true when it’s the ACLU.

WLRN

On Tuesday, Florida voters passed Amendment 4 with over 64 percent of the vote. The passage of the citizen- driven initiative will grant the right to vote to over a million Florida citizens that have been convicted of felonies at some point in their lifetimes.

It's an historic victory for voting rights, according to Howard Simon, the executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) of Florida. 

WLRN

A constitutional amendment that would restore the right for  former felons to vote in Florida passed.

Amendment 4 needed at least 60 percent of votes to pass.

People with felony convictions who complete their sentence and the terms of their release will now automatically have their voting rights restored. 

Florida has never had an automatic restoration process, though many say under Gov. Rick Scott’s administration the steps to have voting right restored grew even more restrictive.

Nadege Green / WLRN

Florida is one of the strictest states when it comes to restoring the right to vote for people with felony convictions.

Former felons do not automatically get the right to vote back after they’ve served their time. That's  1.5 million Floridians who cannot vote.

Amendment 4 would automatically restore the right to vote for former felons except for people with murder or sex crime convictions.

It has wide bipartisan support and very little organized opposition, though some candidates have stated they are not in support of an automatic restoration process.

ACLU

The American Civil Liberties Union of Florida (ACLU of Florida) has taken a public stance on a number of the constitutional amendments Floridians are supposed to vote on in November.

As Gov. Rick Scott’s Cabinet meets for its last clemency board meeting before the state’s general election, the conversation surrounding felon voting rights is ramping up. One amendment on the ballot could put a new restoration system in place.

Miami Herald

  This week on The Florida Roundup...

We bring you the latest information on the developing weather in the Caribbean with Meteorologist Jeff Huffman.

Next, a week after Miami Beach is declared a Zika zone, the virus has infected local politics as new cases are found along the Gulf Coast of Florida. Who exactly is in-charge of getting timely information out to the public? Is it the Governor? Is it the Department of Health? WLRN's Sammy Mack and Jenny Staletovich with the Miami Herald join for this segment. 

Listen here: 

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