hurricanes

A new but controversial study asks if an end is coming to the busy Atlantic hurricane seasons of recent decades.

The Atlantic looks like it is entering in to a new quieter cycle of storm activity, like in the 1970s and 1980s, two prominent hurricane researchers wrote Monday in the journal Nature Geoscience.

Miami Herald

Even with all the radar technology that's available, it's hard to predict what any storm will do (i.e. Hurricane Jeanne). Let's face it, mother nature is not easy to predict.

Erika, which threatened South Florida last week,  was frustrating to forecasters because it didn't want to behave the way some models had pegged it. But, that's not completely unusual according to James Franklin. He oversees forecasters at the National Hurricane Center. 

What about Erika made it hard to forecast? 

Erika Dissolves, Heavy Rain Still Possible In Florida

Aug 29, 2015
Florida Public Radio Emergency Network

Tropical Storm Erika proved to be no match for the volatile conditions aloft and the mountainous terrain of Hispaniola.

As of 9:30 a.m. Saturday morning, the storm had dissolved into a tropical wave.

The National Hurricane Center issued their final advisory on the tropical cyclone, stating that hurricane hunters were unable to find an organized center of circulation.

C.M. Guerrero / El Nuevo Herald

With Tropical Storm Erika on a course to barrel into Florida, Gov. Rick Scott on Friday declared a state of emergency for the entire state.

The executive order pointed to updated forecasts from the National Hurricane Center indicating the storm likely will "travel up the spine of Florida's peninsula." Erika is now expected to remain a tropical storm, rather than turn into a more-powerful hurricane.

Florida Remains in Path of Tropical Storm Erika

Aug 26, 2015
NOAA

Ten years to the week that Hurricane Katrina devastated the Gulf Coast after making initial landfall in Florida, another storm appears to be bearing down on the Sunshine State.

As of Wednesday afternoon, Tropical Storm Erika is less than five days from potential landfall in the state and nearly all of Florida’s east coast lies within the cone of uncertainty.

At the state Emergency Operations Center in Tallahassee, things are still relatively quiet right now, but the center has been partially activated in advance of the storm.

The National Hurricane Center has put Puerto Rico, and some surrounding islands in the Caribbean, under a tropical storm warning as Tropical Storm Erika gains strength in the Atlantic.

The warning means that residents of the island should expect tropical storm winds and heavy rain in the next 36 hours.

Here's the five-day forecast put out by the Hurricane Center:

The Miami Herald explains:

Caribbean Institute for Meteorology and Hydrology

Remember Hurricane Danny roaring out in the Atlantic last week with 115-mile-an-hour gusts? When it reached Puerto Rico this morning it was wheezing.

That’s a big relief for the Caribbean islands – but it also reflects a big problem out there.

The same abnormal climate conditions that helped deflate Danny are also responsible for the some of the worst drought the Caribbean has seen in two decades.

RELATED: The Danger Of Hurricane Complacency

U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Admit it, some of you were watching every single update on Hurricane Danny. Your heart perhaps skipped a beat or two every time the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration kept boosting Danny all the way up to a category three.

As of this post, Monday afternoon, Danny had winds up to 30 mph and was expected to bring a few inches of rain to Puerto Rico and Haiti this week.

Florida Roundup: When Do You Prep For A Storm?

Aug 24, 2015

Last weekend hurricane Danny strengthened to a Category 3 major storm with winds at 115 mph. It's now down to a tropical depression.

While Florida hasn't seen a major storm since Hurricane Wilma blew through in 2005, Florida Division of Emergency Management Director Bryan Koon says residents should prepare every year right around May.

Friday afternoon, Danny became the first major hurricane of the 2015 Atlantic season, after it was upgraded to a Category 3 storm. It's still very far out in the Atlantic, and so far there's no sign it'll pose a threat to the United States.

That leads to a question: When was the last time a big hurricane hit the U.S.?

It might surprise you, but the country is experiencing a historic, nine-year lucky streak when it comes to major hurricanes.

Hurricane Danny Becomes Major Storm At Cat 3

Aug 21, 2015
National Hurricane Center

Hours after it strengthened to a Category 2 hurricane, Danny, this season's first storm grew to a Category 3.

Below is an excerpt from the National Hurricane Center's statement:

Reports from a NOAA Hurricane Hunter aircraft indicate that Danny is now a Category 3 Hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. The maximum winds are estimated to be 115 mph (185 km/h) with higher gusts.

Danny Becomes Atlantic's First Hurricane

Aug 20, 2015
Miami Herald

Tropical Storm Danny strengthened early Thursday to become the first hurricane of the Atlantic season, National Hurricane Center forecasters said.

Sustained winds increased to about 75 mph as Danny headed north, northwest at 12 mph, about 1,000 miles east of the Windward Islands, forecasters said. They expect Danny to continue strengthening at least for the next two days.

The compact storm has hurricane force winds extending only 10 miles from its center, with tropical storm winds reaching about 60 miles.

A tropical depression in the Atlantic Ocean has become a tropical storm named Danny, according to the National Hurricane Center.

NOAA: Saharan Dust Clouds Suppressing Hurricanes

Jul 7, 2015
NRL-Monterey

South Florida's air has been dustier than usual this week. 

The dust has come from across the Atlantic, originating from dust storms in the Sahara desert and being pushed towards the Americas by winds and tropical waves.

While the current influx of dust-filled air may be a hazard for people with respiratory conditions, scientists say it also brings with it a more positive effect.

Palm Beach Post archives

It was a monster.

First, it hit the Caribbean. And once it touched down in the United States, its victims were mostly African-American. When the waters rose and the levee broke, there was nowhere to go. 

This isn't New Orleans during Hurricane Katrina 10 years ago. This is Palm Beach County during the Great Okeechobee Hurricane of 1928. It was one of the deadliest storms in U.S. history, and yet it's been largely forgotten.

“Most Americans have no clue what happened,” says Palm Beach Post reporter and South Florida historian Eliot Kleinberg.

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