parkland

Assault Weapons Registry Would Come At A Cost

Sep 3, 2019
Miami Herald

A panel of state economists on Tuesday estimated it would cost $4 million to build a registry to carry out a proposed constitutional amendment that targets possession of assault weapons, if Floridians approve the measure in November 2020.

The ballot proposal, backed by the political committee Ban Assault Weapons NOW, would prohibit possession of assault weapons but would provide an exception for people who own the guns at the time the measure takes effect. Those people would be able to keep assault weapons if they register the guns with the state.

Updated at 2:15 p.m. ET

With their hopes fading that lawmakers in Washington will pass new gun safety measures, young activists from March for Our Lives have their own plans on how to stem gun violence.

Flickr

Weston Mayor Daniel Stermer plans to introduce an ordinance this month banning guns from public facilities in his Broward County city. Thanks to a recent court ruling, Stermer can put his proposal on the city commisson's agenda without being subject to a fine or getting thrown out of office.

Assault Weapons Definition Could Be Key

Jul 30, 2019
News Service Of Florida

Exactly which guns would be outlawed under a proposed constitutional amendment aimed at stopping Floridians from possessing assault weapons is posing a puzzle for state economists.

The economists’ task is to predict the financial impact that the proposed amendment, backed by the political committee Ban Assault Weapons NOW, would have on state and local economies.

But before they can get to the number crunching, the economists, meeting as the Financial Impact Estimating Conference, have to nail down the specific weapons the proposal seeks to ban.

A Florida judge has struck down a state law that threatened city and county officials with penalties if they approved gun regulations tougher than state laws.

fireworks
Patience Haggin / WLRN

The City of Parkland has been asking people in email blasts and on social media not to explode personal fireworks during their Fourth of July celebrations on Thursday out of respect for people suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD

Symptoms of PTSD can be triggered by unexpected loud noises, including fireworks.

New Florida Law Bans Release Of Mass Shooting Recordings

May 24, 2019

Gov. Ron DeSantis has signed a bill that prohibits Florida's government agencies from releasing photos, video or audio that record the killing of a person in an act of mass violence.

More Mental-Health Treatment Sought For Children

May 24, 2019

Florida has an estimated 400,000 children who need behavioral-health services, but 55 percent of them don’t get any treatment, members of a health-care panel were told Thursday. 

Jamie Doolittle / WLRN News

Parkland officials announced Friday they have decided to keep the Broward Sheriff's Office (BSO) as its law enforcement provider. This decision was made despite the heavy criticism the sheriff's office  faced after the Stoneman Douglas massacre.

The city of Parkland hired the Center for Public Safety to conduct a review of the city's policing options. The options included  the city establishing its own police department, partnering with another municipality or continuing its current relationship with BSO.

Eagles' Haven
Caitie Switalski / WLRN

The Eagles' Haven Wellness Center is just over a mile away from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Coral Springs. The center was scheduled to open at the end of April but decided to start offering services this week after two survivors of last year's shooting died by apparent suicide. 

Since then, more than 100 people have come through the center's doors, seeking connection to therapies or just a place to have a cup of coffee and talk to someone.

Katie Lepri / WLRN

One year ago, a gunman entered Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School and, within six minutes, took the lives of 17 people and injured 17 others.

In the following months, survivors turned into activists, rallying Florida and the country to get serious about gun control.

“Never again” was the rallying cry.

Sam Turken / WLRN

As cars whizzed by and the sun faded, more than 80 people crowded together Thursday afternoon near a garden outside Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. One by one, students recited poems they wrote about love, friendship and innocence lost.

Marisol Garrido remembered Helena Ramsay, who died trying to save another student.

“I am older than you will ever be now. But I still think of you as a friend who was a little bit more like a mom—always caring, always smiling, always giving me a hug in the hallway when I needed one. Helena, right now I need one,” she read.

Katie Lepri / WLRN

They came to pay their respects, to find community, to look for meaning. They brought bundles of flowers, hand-lettered posters, prayers written on paper hearts.

On Thursday night, thousands of people came to Pine Trails Park to hold vigil on the anniversary of the shooting that killed 17 people at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School.

Lily Oppenheimer

In Broward County, Valentine’s Day will never be the same.

On the one-year anniversary of the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, teachers across Broward were determined not to focus on the shooting that killed 17 students on Feb. 14, 2018.

At Seminole Middle School, about 30 minutes from Marjory Stoneman Douglas, teacher Andrea McNiven guided students in activities for the district’s newly-designated "Day of Service and Love." Broward Schools Superintendent Robert Runcie requested lessons about peace and love.

EMILY MICHOT / WLRN NEWS

It’s been one year since a gunman stormed into the campus of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School and took 17 lives. Today’s Sundial program focused on the memories of those lives lost, the activism it inspired, the actions taken by the government and how those affected continue to handle the anguish. 

Pages