gun violence

At Congregation Kol Tikvah in Parkland last week, Rabbi Bradd Boxman told the congregation there was an elephant in the room. The elephant was a prayer, or a piyyut, a liturgical poem, that has been recited during the Jewish New Year for centuries.

The prayer, the Unetaneh Tokef, is about who will live and who will die in the coming year, and how. It involves asking to be inscribed in the book of life, to remain among the living. 

Sam Turken / WLRN

Activists and state elected officials rallied on Saturday outside the Miami-Dade County Youth Fair, calling for an end to gun shows at the center. 

Protestors waved signs and chanted as they faulted the Fair for allowing the gun shows to continue at the fairgrounds in Tamiami Park for more than three decades. 

While the center is home to the annual Youth Fair in the spring, the nonprofit — the Miami-Dade County Fair & Exposition Inc. — leases the property from the county and holds other events there throughout the year. 

Who Is David Katz, The Jacksonville Mass Shooter?

Aug 27, 2018
www.easports.com/madden-nfl

Police have identified the suspected gunman in Sunday’s mass shooting in Jacksonville, Florida.

During an evening press conference, the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office announced that 24-year-old David Katz is believed to have opened fire at a football video game tournament at The Landing in downtown Jacksonville.

Officials said Katz turned the gun on himself after firing several bullets, killing at least two people and injuring more than a dozen others. Police said the death toll may climb.

Ryen Aleman had headphones on and a controller in his hand, playing the popular football video game Madden NFL at a tournament in Jacksonville, Fla., when there were loud pops behind him. Other competitors began bolting out of the room. Something was wrong, he thought. When he realized the jarring sound was gunfire, Aleman told his video game opponent and instructed him to follow his lead.

"Let's crawl down. Let's crawl to the restroom," he said.

Miami Herald

Miami Gardens Mayor Oliver Gilbert has national ambitions for his city. He was recently named President of the African American Mayors Association and took part in the U.S. Conference of Mayors earlier this summer.

Gilbert says the key to improving race relations between police officers and the community starts with engaging youth. He supports the idea of community policing and opening police academies for kids to meet police officers.

“The way you address violence long term is by accessing it early,” Gilbert said.

Allen Eyestone / The Palm Beach Post

The Palm Beach County school district is planning changes for upcoming football games after two people were shot during a pre-season match late Friday night.

Some football games will be played on Saturday mornings, and remaining Friday games will start an hour earlier, at 6 p.m., as a result of the shooting during the Palm Beach Central High School game against William T. Dwyer High School. Also, from now on, only clear bags will be allowed at games, and there will be no re-entry allowed if people leave the stadium during a game.

ANADOLU AGENCY / GETTY IMAGES

The gun legislation passed after the Parkland mass shooting was historic for many reasons, not the least of which was that it represented the first gun restrictions passed in Florida in more than 20 years. 

freedigitalphotos.net

How teenagers envision their futures may have a big influence on whether they threaten or injure someone with a weapon, according to a new research in JAMA Pediatrics. The findings have implications for the health of teens in places struggling to prevent youth violence.

The research began with an observation by Dr. Alison Culyba, an adolescent medicine physician and epidemiologist at the UPMC Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh and the University of Pittsburgh. She’d seen studies on the risk factors that lead to a kid experiencing violence and later, poor health.

Nadege Green / WLRN

They call themselves “Mothers Fighting For Justice.” But it’s not just moms—siblings, girlfriends and close friends are also here.

LOCUST PROJECTS

When medical marijuana passed in Florida as a constitutional amendment in 2016, it had a 72 percent approval rate. But because of a number of legal challenges, medical marijuana patients still can’t actually smoke their pot in Florida. Dara Kam, a senior writer for the News Service of Florida, joined Sundial to discuss the current state of medical marijuana laws in Florida. It's an issue she thinks is going to make its way to the Supreme Court.

Sam Turken / WLRN

U.S. Senator Bill Nelson of Florida toured the Liberty Square public housing complex with local politicians Friday before meeting with more than a dozen Liberty City activists—some of whom have lost relatives to shootings.

The discussion focused on ways to reduce gun violence and improve housing and other opportunities in the area that has long been a hotbed for violence and poverty. 

Two Miami artists are creating a visual archive of the toll gun violence takes by drawing portraits of people whose lives ended abruptly by bullets.

Chire Regans and Markeven Williams embarked on their individual projects around the same time, but they didn't know each other. Regan, a teaching artist at the Perez Art Museum, and Williams, a corrections officer, both say they were moved by the killing of six-year old King Carter in 2016. King was going to buy candy outside of his North Miami-Dade home when he was shot. 

Lily Oppenheimer / WLRN

The faces of 90 victims of gun violence in South Florida, done in black-and-white sketches by PAMM Teaching Artist Chire Regans, presided on Thursday night over a parent forum and resource fair to address youth violence and prevention. They were a stark reminder of the lives at stake if violence and youth outreach isn’t addressed more around Miami-Dade  County. 


Sam Turken / WLRN

Gun violence activists gathered in Miami this weekend as part of a national campaign to honor victims of shootings. 

  

Sunday morning, people in Santa Fe, Texas, flocked to local churches, seeking comfort after this week's high school shooting that killed 10 people and injured 13 others.

The residents of this deeply-religious community are just starting to process their emotions, as they also look for answers as to how such a thing could happen.

"Lord I need you, oh I need you," sang the choir at Arcadia First Baptist Church. It was the refrain of many who are turning to faith to deal with the grim reality that this familiar, and tragic, American routine has now come to their town.

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